Substantive Equality and Women’s Representation in Public Institutions

Constitution Assessment for Women’s Equality Series No. 2
1,552
This publication is only available in electronic format
Published: 
7 July 2022
Language: 
English
Pages: 
14
ISBN: 
978-91-7671-522-2 (PDF)
Author(s): 
Martine van Mil

This brief explores how constitutional advocates for women’s equality in Myanmar can advance women’s representation and meaningful participation in public decision-making and institutions. It looks at how different countries have aimed to do this through their constitutions, and what lessons can be learned for your own advocacy strategies.

It is part of a four-part series, which also includes Brief No. 1. A Guide to Being an Effective Advocate for Gender Equality, and Brief No. 3 Preventing Gender-Based Violence in Myanmar and Brief No. 4. Inclusion and Gender Equality in Post-Coup Myanmar.

Contents

Summary

1. Why does women’s representation in public institutions and decision-making matter?

2. The status of women in public life in Myanmar

3. The Constitution Assessment for Women’s Equality—A resource for inclusive and evidence-based policymaking

4. An inspirational case study: Achieving women’s representation in Tunisia

5. Becoming an advocate for women’s representation in public institutions in Myanmar

References

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