Constituent Assembly Procedures from a Gender Perspective

2,186
This publication is only available in electronic format
Published: 
1 December 2008
Language: 
English
Pages: 
28
ISBN: 
No (Print)
Author(s): 
Jill Cottrell

The Women and Constitution Building Initiative in Nepal was initiated (June 2008) in the spirit of a newly formed Constitution Assembly (CA) which saw the election of a high percentage of women.

International IDEA, together with its partners, identified a need for a greater understanding of how a constitution affects women’s lives and how women can contribute to the process of making a new constitution. Strategies were needed to support the creation of an inclusive political environment in a crucial period of Nepal’s history.

This Discussion Paper raises issues about how the Constituent Assembly will work. The CA’s procedures will have an impact on women members’ ability to play a part in its work, and on how women’s issues will be dealt with in the new Constitution due to be drafted by the Assembly. 

Contents

Introduction

Why do we need rules?

Should we be focusing on women members at all?

Women in legislative settings

The particular situation of women Constituent Assembly members in Nepal

Political parties in the Constituent Assembly

Where are the real decisions made?

Caucuses

Facilities

Thinking about Procedures

Getting to Grips with the Rules

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Image credit: International IDEA

Image credit: International IDEA 

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Mar
09
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A collection of speakers from past events.

Top row from left to right: Patricia Torsney, Permanent Observer for the Inter-Parliamentary Union to the United Nations; Anne-Marie Goetz, Professor of Global Affair at the New York University; Maria Bassols, Deputy Permanent Representative for the Permanent Mission of Spain to the United Nations; Malene Almeida, Coordinator at Praia City Group on Governance Statistics; Rumbidzai Kandawasvika-Nhundu, Senior Advisor at International IDEA. 

Middle Row from left to right:  Annika Silva-Leander, Head of Democracy Assessment at International IDEA; Keboitse Machangana, Former Director of Global Programme at International IDEA; Annika Savill, Executive Head for the United Nations Democracy Fund (UNDEF); Njeri Kabeberi, Chair of International IDEA’s Board of Advisers; Sarah Lister, Head of Governance at United Nations Development Programme (UNDP); Margot Wallström, Former Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Foreign Affairs of Sweden. 

Bottom row from left to right: Pippa Norris, Lecturer and Political Science at Harvard University; Simonetta Sommaruga, President of the Swiss Confederation; Maria Leissner, Ambassador at Sweden’s Ministry for Foreign Affairs; Riika Laatu, Finnish Ambassador to Myanmar; Amina Mohammed, Deputy Secretary-General of the United Nations and Chair of the United Nations Sustainable Development Group. 

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