Estonia

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Question Value
1. Is there a ban on donations from foreign interests to political parties?
  • CodeYes
  • Comment

    There is a ban on donations from foreign interests, except for donations by persons holding the permanent right of residence or the status of a long-term resident in Estonia.

  • Source

    A donation that does not comply with the terms and conditions laid down in subsection (1) of this section is prohibited. Above all, the following is prohibited: […]
    8) donations by aliens, except for donations by persons holding the permanent right of residence or the status of a long-term resident in Estonia. […]
    Source: § 12.3(2), Political Parties Act, 1994 (amended 2014)

2. Is there a ban on donations from foreign interests to candidates?
  • CodeYes
  • Comment

    There is a ban on donations from foreign interests, except for donations by persons holding the permanent right of residence or the status of a long-term resident in Estonia

  • Source

    The sources of funding of the election campaign of a single candidate include:
    1) donations made on the terms and conditions laid down in this Act;
    2) personal property of the single candidate.
    Source: § 5.2(3), Political Parties Act, 1994 (amended 2014)

    A donation that does not comply with the terms and conditions laid down in subsection (1) of this section is prohibited. Above all, the following is prohibited: […]
    8) donations by aliens, except for donations by persons holding the permanent right of residence or the status of a long-term resident in Estonia. […]
    Source: § 12.3(2), Political Parties Act, 1994 (amended 2014)

3. Is there a ban on corporate donations to political parties?
  • CodeYes
  • Comment
  • Source

    A donation that does not comply with the terms and conditions laid down in subsection (1) of this section is prohibited. Above all, the following is prohibited: […]
    2) donations by legal persons; […]
    Source: § 12.3(2), Political Parties Act, 1994
    (amended 2014)

4. Is there a ban on corporate donations to candidates?
  • CodeYes
  • Comment
  • Source

    The sources of funding of the election campaign of a single candidate include:
    1) donations made on the terms and conditions laid down in this Act;
    2) personal property of the single candidate.
    Source: § 5.2(3), Political Parties Act, 1994 (amended 2014)

    A donation that does not comply with the terms and conditions laid down in subsection (1) of this section is prohibited. Above all, the following is prohibited: […]
    2) donations by legal persons; […]
    Source: § 12.3(2), Political Parties Act, 1994 (amended 2014)

5. Is there a ban on donations from Trade Unions to political parties?
  • CodeYes
  • Comment

    All donations from legal persons are banned.

  • Source

    A donation that does not comply with the terms and conditions laid down in subsection (1) of this section is prohibited. Above all, the following is prohibited: […]
    2) donations by legal persons; […]
    Source: § 12.3(2), Political Parties Act, 1994 (amended 2014)

6. Is there a ban on donations from Trade Unions to candidates?
  • CodeYes
  • Comment

    All donations from legal persons are banned.

  • Source

    The sources of funding of the election campaign of a single candidate include:
    1) donations made on the terms and conditions laid down in this Act;
    2) personal property of the single candidate.
    Source: § 5.2(3), Political Parties Act, 1994 (amended 2014)

    A donation that does not comply with the terms and conditions laid down in subsection (1) of this section is prohibited. Above all, the following is prohibited: […]
    2) donations by legal persons; […]
    Source: § 12.3(2), Political Parties Act, 1994 (amended 2014)

7. Is there a ban on anonymous donations to political parties?
  • CodeYes
  • Comment
  • Source

    A donation that does not comply with the terms and conditions laid down in subsection (1) of this section is prohibited. Above all, the following is prohibited: […]
    1) anonymous donations; […]
    Source: § 12.3(2), Political Parties Act, 1994 (amended 2014)

8. Is there a ban on anonymous donations to candidates?
  • CodeYes
  • Comment
  • Source

    The sources of funding of the election campaign of a single candidate include:
    1) donations made on the terms and conditions laid down in this Act;
    2) personal property of the single candidate.
    Source: § 5.2(3), Political Parties Act, 1994 (amended 2014)

    A donation that does not comply with the terms and conditions laid down in subsection (1) of this section is prohibited. Above all, the following is prohibited: […]
    1) anonymous donations; […]
    Source: § 12.3(2), Political Parties Act, 1994 (amended 2014)

9. Is there a ban on donations from corporations with government contracts to political parties?
  • CodeYes
  • Comment

    All donations from legal persons are banned.

  • Source

    A donation that does not comply with the terms and conditions laid down in subsection (1) of this section is prohibited. Above all, the following is prohibited: […]
    2) donations by legal persons; […]
    Source: § 12.3(2), Political Parties Act, 1994 (amended 2014)

10. Is there a ban on donations from corporations with government contracts to candidates?
  • CodeYes
  • Comment

    All donations from legal persons are banned.

  • Source

    The sources of funding of the election campaign of a single candidate include:
    1) donations made on the terms and conditions laid down in this Act;
    2) personal property of the single candidate.
    Source: § 5.2(3), Political Parties Act, 1994 (amended 2014)

    A donation that does not comply with the terms and conditions laid down in subsection (1) of this section is prohibited. Above all, the following is prohibited: […]
    2) donations by legal persons; […]
    Source: § 12.3(2), Political Parties Act, 1994 (amended 2014)

11. Is there a ban on donations from corporations with partial government ownership to political parties?
  • CodeYes
  • Comment

    All donations from legal persons are banned.

  • Source

    A donation that does not comply with the terms and conditions laid down in subsection (1) of this section is prohibited. Above all, the following is prohibited: […]
    2) donations by legal persons; […]
    Source: § 12.3(2), Political Parties Act, 1994 (amended 2014)

12. Is there a ban on donations from corporations with partial government ownership to candidates?
  • CodeYes
  • Comment

    All donations from legal persons are banned.

  • Source

    The sources of funding of the election campaign of a single candidate include:
    1) donations made on the terms and conditions laid down in this Act;
    2) personal property of the single candidate.
    Source: § 5.2(3), Political Parties Act, 1994 (amended 2014)

    A donation that does not comply with the terms and conditions laid down in subsection (1) of this section is prohibited. Above all, the following is prohibited: […]
    2) donations by legal persons; […]
    Source: § 12.3(2), Political Parties Act, 1994 (amended 2014)

13. Is there a ban on the use of state resources in favour or against a political party or candidate?
  • CodeYes
  • Comment
  • Source

    A political party is prohibited to use public funds for conducting or organising the election campaign of the political party or a person running in the list of the political party, except for the allocations from the state budget based on this Act. An election coalition, single candidate, person running in the list of a political party and person running in the list of an election coalition is prohibited to use public funds for conducting or organising their election campaign. The provisions of § 12.4 of this Act apply to such prohibited income. For the purposes of this section, ‘public funds’ means state budget funds and local authority budget funds.
    Source: § 12.1(3), Political Parties Act, 1994
    (amended 2014)

14. Is there a limit on the amount a donor can contribute to a political party during a non-election specific period?
  • CodeYes, for natural persons
  • Comment
  • Source

    A political party is allowed to accept cash donations from a natural person to the extent of up to 1200 euros per financial year. Cash donations are immediately registered by a political party as revenue.
    Source: § 12.3(3), Political Parties Act, 1994
    (amended 2014

15. If there is a limit on the amount a donor can contribute to a political party during a non-election specific period, what is the limit?
  • Code EUR 1,200
  • Comment
  • Source

    A political party is allowed to accept cash donations from a natural person to the extent of up to 1200 euros per financial year. Cash donations are immediately registered by a political party as revenue.
    Source: § 12.3(3), Political Parties Act, 1994
    (amended 2014)

16. Is there a limit on the amount a donor can contribute to a political party during an election?
  • CodeYes, for natural persons
  • Comment

    A limit on the amount of donation is not related to an election and is always the same.

  • Source

    A political party is allowed to accept cash donations from a natural person to the extent of up to 1200 euros per financial year. Cash donations are immediately registered by a political party as revenue.
    Source: § 12.3(3), Political Parties Act, 1994
    (amended 2014)

17. If there is a limit on the amount a donor can contribute to a political party during an election, what is the limit?
  • Code EUR 1,200
  • Comment

    A limit on the amount of donation is not related to an election and is always the same.

  • Source

    A political party is allowed to accept cash donations from a natural person to the extent of up to 1200 euros per financial year. Cash donations are immediately registered by a political party as revenue.
    Source: § 12.3(3), Political Parties Act, 1994
    (amended 2014)

18. Is there a limit on the amount a donor can contribute to a candidate?
  • CodeYes, for natural persons
  • Comment
  • Source

    The sources of funding of the election campaign of a single candidate include:
    1) donations made on the terms and conditions laid down in this Act;
    2) personal property of the single candidate.
    Source: § 5.2(3), Political Parties Act, 1994 (amended 2014)

    A political party is allowed to accept cash donations from a natural person to the extent of up to 1200 euros per financial year. Cash donations are immediately registered by a political party as revenue.
    Source: § 12.3(3), Political Parties Act, 1994 (amended 2014

19. If there is a limit on the amount a donor can contribute to a candidate, what is the limit?
  • Code EUR 1,200
  • Comment
  • Source

    The sources of funding of the election campaign of a single candidate include:
    1) donations made on the terms and conditions laid down in this Act;
    2) personal property of the single candidate.
    Source: § 5.2(3), Political Parties Act, 1994 (amended 2014)

    A political party is allowed to accept cash donations from a natural person to the extent of up to 1200 euros per financial year. Cash donations are immediately registered by a political party as revenue.
    Source: § 12.3(3), Political Parties Act, 1994 (amended 2014)

20. Is there a limit on the amount a candidate can contribute to their own election campaign?
  • CodeNo
  • Comment

    There is the limit of the cash donations, but candidate can use also personal property without limitation.

  • Source

    The sources of funding of the election campaign of a single candidate include:
    1) donations made on the terms and conditions laid down in this Act;
    2) personal property of the single candidate.
    Source: § 5.2(3), Political Parties Act, 1994 (amended 2014)

    A political party is allowed to accept cash donations from a natural person to the extent of up to 1200 euros per financial year. Cash donations are immediately registered by a political party as revenue.
    Source: § 12.3(3), Political Parties Act, 1994 (amended 2014)

21. Is there a limit on in-kind donations to political parties?
  • CodeYes
  • Comment

    The donation limit is common for cash and in-kind donations.

  • Source

    A political party is allowed to accept cash donations from a natural person to the extent of up to 1200 euros per financial year. Cash donations are immediately registered by a political party as revenue.
    Source: § 12.3(3), Political Parties Act, 1994 (amended 2014)

    The usual value of the object or right serves as the basis for evaluation of a non-monetary donation. If there are generally acknowledged experts for evaluation of an object, the object of a non-monetary donation will be evaluated by them. If a non-monetary donation has been evaluated below its actual value, the difference between the values will be deemed a prohibited donation.
    Source: § 12.3(4), Political Parties Act, 1994 (amended 2014)

22. Is there a limit on in-kind donations to candidates?
  • CodeYes
  • Comment

    The donation limit is common for cash and in-kind donations. However, candidate can use personal property without limitation.

  • Source

    The sources of funding of the election campaign of a single candidate include:
    1) donations made on the terms and conditions laid down in this Act;
    2) personal property of the single candidate.
    Source: § 5.2(3), Political Parties Act, 1994 (amended 2014)

    A political party is allowed to accept cash donations from a natural person to the extent of up to 1200 euros per financial year. Cash donations are immediately registered by a political party as revenue.
    Source: § 12.3(3), Political Parties Act, 1994 (amended 2014)

    The usual value of the object or right serves as the basis for evaluation of a non-monetary donation. If there are generally acknowledged experts for evaluation of an object, the object of a non-monetary donation will be evaluated by them. If a non-monetary donation has been evaluated below its actual value, the difference between the values will be deemed a prohibited donation.
    Source: § 12.3(4), Political Parties Act, 1994 (amended 2014)

23. Is there a ban on political parties engaging in commercial activities?
  • CodeYes
  • Comment
  • Source

    A political party cannot be a shareholder of any other legal person.
    Source: § 12.6(2), Political Parties Act, 1994 (amended 2014)

    Political parties are formed on the principle of territoriality. Political parties cannot found sub-units in institutions, enterprises or organisations.
    Source: § 3(1), Political Parties Act, 1994 (amended 2014)

24. Is there a ban on political parties taking loans in relation to election campaigns?
  • CodeSometimes
  • Comment

    The restriction applies without distinction to election related or non-election related.

  • Source

    (1) A political party may enter into a loan contract only if the lender is a credit institution and the lending and borrowing takes place on market conditions. A loan agreement may be secured only with the property of the political party or the suretyship of a member of the political party.
    (1.1) The upper limit of obligations arising from loan agreements is 25 per cent of the sum allocated to political parties from the state budget. The political party funding supervision committee will disclose the sum on its website. The upper limit will not be applied to an election coalition or a political party whose total revenue specified in subsection 121(2) was below 50 000 euros in the previous financial year.
    Source: § 12.2 (1-1.1), Political Parties Act, 1994
    (amended 2014)

25. Is there a ban on candidates taking loans in relation to election campaigns?
  • CodeNo
  • Comment

    The regulation suggests that candidates, as natural persons, are able to take loans and to spend it on campaigns BUT the Law does not regulates that directly.

  • Source

    The sources of funding of the election campaign of a single candidate include:
    1) donations made on the terms and conditions laid down in this Act;
    2) personal property of the single candidate.
    Source: § 5.2(3), Political Parties Act, 1994 (amended 2014)

26. Is there a ban on donors to political parties/candidates participating in public tender/procurement processes?
  • CodeNo data
  • Comment
  • Source
27. Are there provisions requiring donations to go through the banking system?
  • CodeNo
  • Comment

    There are no explicit provisions requiring donations to go through the banking system.

  • Source

    Source: Political Parties Act, 1994 (amended 2014)

Question Value
28. Are there provisions for direct public funding to political parties?
  • CodeYes, regularly
  • Comment
  • Source

    (1) A political party represented in the Riigikoguhas the right to receive an allocation from the state budget by the fifth date of each calendar month. The size of the monthly allocation is one twelfth of the annual amount. The size of the allocation is proportionate to the number of seats obtained in the elections of the Riigikogu.
    (2) A political party that participated in the elections of the Riigikogu, but did not exceed the election threshold and received at least:
    1) 2% but less than 3% of the votes, will receive an annual allocation of 30 000 euros from the state budget;
    2) 3% but less than 4% of the votes, will receive an annual allocation of 60 000 euros from the state budget;
    3) 4% but less than 5% of the votes, will receive an annual allocation of 100 000 euros from the state budget.
    Source: § 12.7(1-2), Political Parties Act, 1994 (amended 2014)

29. What are the eligibility criteria for political parties to receive public funding?
  • CodeRepresentation in elected body | Share of votes in previous election | Share of seats in previous election | Participation in election | Registration as a political party
  • Comment
  • Source

    (1) A political party represented in the Riigikoguhas the right to receive an allocation from the state budget by the fifth date of each calendar month. The size of the monthly allocation is one twelfth of the annual amount. The size of the allocation is proportionate to the number of seats obtained in the elections of the Riigikogu.
    (2) A political party that participated in the elections of the Riigikogu, but did not exceed the election threshold and received at least:
    1) 2% but less than 3% of the votes, will receive an annual allocation of 30 000 euros from the state budget;
    2) 3% but less than 4% of the votes, will receive an annual allocation of 60 000 euros from the state budget;
    3) 4% but less than 5% of the votes, will receive an annual allocation of 100 000 euros from the state budget.
    Source: § 12.7(1-2), Political Parties Act, 1994 (amended 2014)

30. What is the allocation calculation for political parties to receive public funding?
  • CodeProportional to votes received | Proportional to seats received
  • Comment
  • Source

    (1) A political party represented in the Riigikoguhas the right to receive an allocation from the state budget by the fifth date of each calendar month. The size of the monthly allocation is one twelfth of the annual amount. The size of the allocation is proportionate to the number of seats obtained in the elections of the Riigikogu.
    (2) A political party that participated in the elections of the Riigikogu, but did not exceed the election threshold and received at least:
    1) 2% but less than 3% of the votes, will receive an annual allocation of 30 000 euros from the state budget;
    2) 3% but less than 4% of the votes, will receive an annual allocation of 60 000 euros from the state budget;
    3) 4% but less than 5% of the votes, will receive an annual allocation of 100 000 euros from the state budget.
    Source: § 12.7(1-2), Political Parties Act, 1994 (amended 2014)

31. What are the provisions on 'ear marking' direct public funding to political parties (how it should be used)?
  • CodeNo
  • Comment

    There are no provisions for what direct public funding must be used.

  • Source

    Source: Political Parties Act, 1994 (amended 2014)

32. Are there provisions for free or subsidized access to media for political parties?
  • CodeNo
  • Comment

    There are no explicit provisions for free or subsidized access to media for political parties.

  • Source

    Source: Political Parties Act, 1994 (amended 2014)

33. What criteria determine allocation for free or subsidized access to media for political parties?
  • CodeNot applicable
  • Comment
  • Source
34. Are there provisions for free or subsidized access to media for candidates?
  • CodeNo
  • Comment

    There are no explicit provisions for free or subsidized access to media for candidates.

  • Source

    Source: Political Parties Act, 1994 (amended 2014)

35. Are there provisions for any other form of indirect public funding?
  • CodeYes
  • Comment

    Notices and advertisements relating to the election campaigns of political parties, election coalitions and independent candidates are exempt from advertisement tax.

  • Source

    Notices of state and local government agencies and notices and advertisements relating to the election campaigns of political parties, election coalitions and independent candidates are exempt from advertisement tax.
    Source: § 10(3), Local Taxes Act, 1994
    (amended 2013)

36. Is the provision of direct public funding to political parties tied to gender equality among candidates?
  • CodeNo
  • Comment
  • Source

    Source: Political Parties Act, 1994 (amended 2014)

37. Are there provisions for other financial advantages to encourage gender equality in political parties?
  • CodeNo
  • Comment
  • Source

    Source: Political Parties Act, 1994 (amended 2014)

Question Value
38. Is there a ban on vote buying?
  • CodeYes
  • Comment

    (1) Preventing of a person from electing or being elected at an election or from voting at a referendum, and promising or providing of assets or other benefits with the intention of persuading the person not to exercise his or her election or voting rights or to exercise such rights in a certain way, and influencing of a person for the same purpose by use of an official position, violence, deception or dependent relationship of the person with the offender, is punishable by a pecuniary punishment or up to three years’ imprisonment.
    (2) The same act, if committed by a legal person, is punishable by a pecuniary punishment.

    Source: § 162(1-2), Penal Code, 2001 (amended 2020)

  • Source
39. Are there limits on the amount a political party can spend?
  • CodeNo
  • Comment

    There are no explicit provisions about limits on the amount a political party can spend.

  • Source

    Source: Political Parties Act, 1994 (amended 2014)

40. If there are limits on the amount a political party can spend, what is the limit?
  • CodeNot applicable
  • Comment
  • Source
41. Are there limits on the amount a candidate can spend?
  • CodeNo
  • Comment

    There are no explicit provisions about limits on the amount a candidate can spend.

  • Source

    Source: Political Parties Act, 1994 (amended 2014)

42. If there are limits on the amount a candidate can spend, what is the limit?
  • CodeNot applicable
  • Comment
  • Source
43. Are there limits on the amount that third parties can spend on election campaign activities?
  • CodeYes, third parties banned from campaign spending
  • Comment

    Third parties banned from campaign spending. However, as an exception, affiliated organisation of a political party can spend money on election campaign activities.

  • Source

    A donation that does not comply with the terms and conditions laid down in subsection (1) of this section is prohibited. Above all, the following is prohibited: […]
    6) payment of the expenses of a political party by third parties for the political party or making concessions to the political party, unless the payment of such expenses or the making of such concessions is also available to other persons in ordinary economic activities;[…]
    Source: § 12.3(2), Political Parties Act, 1994
    (amended 2014)

    For the purposes of this act ‘affiliated organisation of a political party’ means a foundation or a non-profit association whose founder or member the political party is and whose activities are aimed at the attainment of the goals and objectives of the political party laid down in § 1 of this Act. The requirements for political parties laid down in §§ 12.1–12.4of this Act also extend to the affiliated organisations of political parties. Donations of a political party to its affiliated organisation are permitted.
    Source: § 12.6(1), Political Parties Act, 1994 (amended 2014)

    A political party submits a report on the election campaign expenses of persons who ran in the list of the political party and on the election campaign expenses of affiliated organisations as well as the origins of the funds used to cover the expenses.
    Source: § 12.8(2), Political Parties Act, 1994 (amended 2014)

44. Are there limits on traditional media advertising spending in relation to election campaigns?
  • CodeNo
  • Comment

    There are no explicit provisions on traditional media advertising spending in relation to election campaigns.

  • Source

    Source: Political Parties Act, 1994 (amended 2014)

45. Are there limits on online media advertising spending in relation to election campaigns?
  • CodeNo
  • Comment

    There are no explicit provisions on online media advertising spending in relation to election campaigns.

  • Source

    Source: Political Parties Act, 1994 (amended 2014)

46. Do any other restrictions on online media advertisement (beyond limits) exist?
  • CodeNo
  • Comment
  • Source

    Source: Political Parties Act, 1994 (amended 2014)

Question Value
47. Do political parties have to report regularly on their finances?
  • CodeYes
  • Comment
  • Source

    A political party will draw up a quarterly report on their expenses as of the end of the quarter and submit it to the political party funding supervision committee in the required form by the 10th date of the month following the quarter. The report will set out the expenses divided into the following categories:
    1) expenses of political activities;
    2) labour expenses;
    3) administrative expenses.
    Source: § 12.1(8), Political Parties Act, 1994
    (amended 2014)

48. Do political parties have to report on their election campaign finances?
  • CodeYes
  • Comment
  • Source

    (1) Political parties, election coalitions and single candidates submit to the political party funding supervision committee a report on the expenses of the Riigikogu, European Parliament or local authority council election campaign. The report is submitted to the political party funding supervision committee in the required form within one month from the election day. The election campaign report is published on the website of the political party funding supervision committee.
    (2)A political party submits a report on the election campaign expenses of persons who ran in the list of the political party and on the election campaign expenses of affiliated organisations as well as the origins of the funds used to cover the expenses.
    Source: § 12.8(1-2), Political Parties Act, 1994
    (amended 2014)

49. Do candidates have to report on their election campaign finances?
  • CodeYes
  • Comment
  • Source

    (1) Political parties, election coalitions and single candidates submit to the political party funding supervision committee a report on the expenses of the Riigikogu, European Parliament or local authority council election campaign. The report is submitted to the political party funding supervision committee in the required form within one month from the election day. The election campaign report is published on the website of the political party funding supervision committee.
    (5) A single candidate submits a report on the election campaign expenses and the origin of the funds used.
    Source: § 12.8(1, 5), Political Parties Act, 1994
    (amended 2014)

50. Do third parties have to report on election campaign finances?
  • CodeThird parties are banned from participating in campaigns
  • Comment

    Third parties are  banned from campaign spending. However, as an exception, affiliated organisation of a political party can spend money on election campaign activities. A political party submits a report on the election campaign expenses of affiliated organizations.

  • Source

    (1) Political parties, election coalitions and single candidates submit to the political party funding supervision committee a report on the expenses of the Riigikogu, European Parliament or local authority council election campaign. The report is submitted to the political party funding supervision committee in the required form within one month from the election day. The election campaign report is published on the website of the political party funding supervision committee.
    (2)A political party submits a report on the election campaign expenses of persons who ran in the list of the political party and on the election campaign expenses of affiliated organisations as well as the origins of the funds used to cover the expenses.
    Source: § 12.8(1-2), Political Parties Act, 1994 (amended 2014)

51. Is information in reports from political parties and/or candidates to be made public?
  • CodeYes
  • Comment
  • Source

    As of the end of the quarter, a political party will draw up a quarterly report on the revenues earned and loans obtained following the list of sources specified in subsection (2) of this section and submit it to the political party funding supervision committee in the required form by the tenth day of the month following the quarter. The report will set out the date specified in subsections (5) and (6) of this section. The report will be published on the website of the political party funding supervision committee. Upon publication of the report on the website of the political party funding supervision committee, the personal identification code specified in subsections (6) and (7) of this section will be replaced by the person’s date of birth.
    Source: § 12.1(4), Political Parties Act, 1994 (amended 2014)

    Political parties, election coalitions and single candidates submit to the political party funding supervision committee a report on the expenses of the Riigikogu, European Parliament or local authority council election campaign. The report is submitted to the political party funding supervision committee in the required form within one month from the election day. The election campaign report is published on the website of the political party funding supervision committee.
    Source: § 12.8(1), Political Parties Act, 1994 (amended 2014)

52. Must reports from political parties and/or candidates reveal the identity of donors?
  • CodeYes
  • Comment
  • Source

    (4)As of the end of the quarter, a political party will draw up a quarterly report on the revenues earned and loans obtained following the list of sources specified in subsection (2) of this section and submit it to the political party funding supervision committee in the required form by the tenth day of the month following the quarter. The report will set out the date specified in subsections (5) and (6) of this section. The report will be published on the website of the political party funding supervision committee. Upon publication of the report on the website of the political party funding supervision committee, the personal identification code specified in subsections (6) and (7) of this section will be replaced by the person’s date of birth.
    (7) With regard to a donation a political party will indicate that it is a donation and indicate the name and personal identification code of the donator and the value and the date of accrual of the donation.
    Source: § 12.1(4, 7), Political Parties Act, 1994 (amended 2014)

    A single candidate indicates the type of the source of the funds specified in subsection 52(3) of this Act, which was used for the election campaign. The name and personal identification of the donator, the value of the donation and the date of accrual and, with regard to personal assets, the sum of money used for the election campaign are indicated with regard to a donation. The report is submitted and disclosed in accordance with the procedure provided for in subsection (1) of this section.
    Source: § 12.8(8), Political Parties Act, 1994 (amended 2014)

53. Must reports from political parties and/or candidates include information on itemized income?
  • CodeYes
  • Comment

    Both for political parties and candidates.

  • Source

    (4)As of the end of the quarter, a political party will draw up a quarterly report on the revenues earned and loans obtained following the list of sources specified in subsection (2) of this section and submit it to the political party funding supervision committee in the required form by the tenth day of the month following the quarter. The report will set out the date specified in subsections (5) and (6) of this section. The report will be published on the website of the political party funding supervision committee. Upon publication of the report on the website of the political party funding supervision committee, the personal identification code specified in subsections (6) and (7) of this section will be replaced by the person’s date of birth.
    (7) With regard to a donation a political party will indicate that it is a donation and indicate the name and personal identification code of the donator and the value and the date of accrual of the donation.
    Source: § 12.1(4, 7), Political Parties Act, 1994 (amended 2014)

    A single candidate indicates the type of the source of the funds specified in subsection 52(3) of this Act, which was used for the election campaign. The name and personal identification of the donator, the value of the donation and the date of accrual and, with regard to personal assets, the sum of money used for the election campaign are indicated with regard to a donation. The report is submitted and disclosed in accordance with the procedure provided for in subsection (1) of this section.
    Source: § 12.8(8), Political Parties Act, 1994 (amended 2014)

54. Must reports from political parties and/or candidates include information on itemized spending?
  • CodeYes
  • Comment

    Both for political parties and candidates.

  • Source

    (8) A political party will draw up a quarterly report on their expenses as of the end of the quarter and submit it to the political party funding supervision committee in the required form by the 10thdate of the month following the quarter. The report will set out the expenses divided into the following categories:
    1) expenses of political activities;
    2) labour expenses;
    3) administrative expenses.

    (9) The expenses of political activities specified in clause 1) of subsection (8) of this section will categorised in  the report as follows:
    1) advertising expenses by type (television, radio, online, outdoor and newspaper advertising, printed adverting materials);
    2) public relations expenses;
    3) publication expenses;
    4) expenses of public events;
    5) Other expenses of political activities.
    Source: § 12.1(8-9, Political Parties Act, 1994 (amended 2014)

    (1) Political parties, election coalitions and single candidates submit to the political party funding supervision committee a report on the expenses of the Riigikogu, European Parliament or local authority council election campaign. The report is submitted to the political party funding supervision committee in the required form within one month from the election day. The election campaign report is published on the website of the political party funding supervision committee.

    (5) A single candidate submits a report on the election campaign expenses and the origin of the funds used.

    (9) Expenses are recognised based on the following expense types:
    1) advertising expenses by type (television, radio, online, outdoor and newspaper advertising, printed adverting materials);
    2) public relations expenses;
    3) publication expenses;
    4) expenses of public events;
    5) other election campaign expenses.

    (10) The following is indicated in the report regarding expenses:
    1) the date of the expense receipt;
    2) the number of the expense receipt;
    3) the name of the recipient;
    4) the personal identification or registry code of the recipient;
    5) the expense type;
    6) the price of the expense;
    7) the expense amount paid;
    8) the expense amount payable;
    9) the date of payment.
    Source: § 12.8(1, 5, 9-10), Political Parties Act, 1994 (amended 2014)

55. Which institution(s) receives financial reports from political parties and/or candidates?
  • CodeSpecial agency for political finance
  • Comment

    Political Party Funding Supervision Committee receives financial reports from political parties and candidates.

  • Source

    (4)As of the end of the quarter, a political party will draw up a quarterly report on the revenues earned and loans obtained following the list of sources specified in subsection (2) of this section and submit it to the political party funding supervision committee in the required form by the tenth day of the month following the quarter. The report will set out the date specified in subsections (5) and (6) of this section. The report will be published on the website of the political party funding supervision committee. Upon publication of the report on the website of the political party funding supervision committee, the personal identification code specified in subsections (6) and (7) of this section will be replaced by the person’s date of birth.
    Source: § 12.1(4), Political Parties Act, 1994 (amended 2014)
    Political parties, election coalitions and single candidates submit to the political party funding supervision committee a report on the expenses of the Riigikogu, European Parliament or local authority council election campaign. The report is submitted to the political party funding supervision committee in the required form within one month from the election day. The election campaign report is published on the website of the political party funding supervision committee.
    Source: § 12.8(1), Political Parties Act, 1994 (amended 2014)

56. Which institution(s) is responsible for examining financial reports and/or investigating violations?
  • CodeSpecial agency for political finance
  • Comment

    Political Party Funding Supervision Committee is responsible for examining financial reports

  • Source

    The political party funding supervision committee verifies whether political parties, election coalitions and single candidates adhere to the requirements provided for in this Act.
    Source: § 12.10(1), Political Parties Act, 1994
    (amended 2014

57. What power is granted to the institution(s) responsible for examining reports and/or investigating violations?
  • CodeRefer for investigation | Carry out investigation | Request additional information from potential violator | Impose sanctions
  • Comment
  • Source

    To perform the functions arising from subsections (1) and (11) of this section, the political party funding supervision committee has the right to demand that a political party, an election coalition or a single candidate undergo a special audit. The political party funding supervision committee will appoint an auditor by way of drawing lots among the certified auditors entered in the register of auditors. The name of the auditor and the reason of involving the auditor will be communicated to the party to the proceedings before involving the auditor, unless the matter needs to be attended to urgently or if the notification could impede the attainment of the purpose of the audit. The expenses of the audit are covered from the budget of the political party funding supervision committee. The political party funding supervision committee will establish a more detailed procedure for appointment of auditors.
    Source: § 12.10(1.2), Political Parties Act, 1994 (amended 2014)

    (1) The political party funding supervision committee will make a precept to a political party, a person running as a candidate in the list of a political party, an election coalition, a person running as a candidate in the list of an election coalition or a single candidate if the person:
    1) has failed to perform the obligation to submit the report required under this Act or if the report contains deficiencies;
    2) has failed to return a prohibited donation;
    3) has not recognised an accepted donation;
    4) has not transferred a prohibited donation to the state budget;
    5) has failed to submit the documents specified in subsection 12.8(2) of this Act;
    6) has failed to submit a document requested by the committee by the prescribed date.

    (2) In a precept a political party, a person running as a candidate in the list of a political party, an election coalition, a person running as a candidate in the list of an election coalition or a single candidate is required to:
    1) within the term set by the committee, submit the required documents or report or remove the deficiencies contained in the report or in the register of donations;
    2) transfer the donation to the state budget in one of the manners specified in subsections 12,4(1)-(3) of this Act by the date prescribed by the committee.

    (2.1) If a political party that receives allocations from the state budget or a person who ran in the list of the political party has not transferred a donation to the state budget in any of the manners specified in subsections 12.4(1)–(3) of this Act or returned it to the donator, the government agency appointed on the basis of subsection 12.7(4) of this Act will reduce the support paid on the basis of subsections of 127(1) and (2) of this Act to the extent of the triple of the donation amount specified in the precept, but no more than to the extent of 20 per cent of the support.

    (6) To verify adherence to this Act, the political party funding supervision committee has the right to request documents from all the persons specified in subsection (1) of this section. The documents are requested in writing, indicating the purpose and legal ground of the request and referring to the possibilities of making a precept if the document is not submitted by the prescribed date. The term granted for the submission of a document must not be shorter than ten days.
    Source: § 12.11(1-2.1, 6), Political Parties Act, 1994 (amended 2014)

    In the event of failure to comply with a precept specified in clauses 1211(1) 1)-3), 5) and 6) of this Act, the political party funding supervision committee may impose a coercive payment of up to 15 000 euros in accordance with the procedure provided for in the Substitutive Enforcement and Coercive Payments Act.
    Source: § 12.12(1), Political Parties Act, 1994 (amended 2014)

58. What sanctions are provided for political finance infractions?
  • CodeFines | Loss of public funding
  • Comment

    Possible loss of public funding can be reduced no more than to the extent of 20 per cent of the support.

    Numerous fines are set out in the §§ 12.12 and 12.14-12.19. Articles 12.14 -12.19 regulates such cases as:
    Failure to inform of current account of political party;
    Failure to inform of current account of election coalition or single candidate;
    Failure to inform of affiliated organisation of political party;
    Failure to perform reporting obligation;
    Making and accepting prohibited donations; 
    Provision of false information and incorrect information.

  • Source

    (2.1) If a political party that receives allocations from the state budget or a person who ran in the list of the political party has not transferred a donation to the state budget in any of the manners specified in subsections 12.4(1)–(3) of this Act or returned it to the donator, the government agency appointed on the basis of subsection 12.7(4) of this Act will reduce the support paid on the basis of subsections of 12.7(1) and (2) of this Act to the extent of the triple of the donation amount specified in the precept, but no more than to the extent of 20 per cent of the support.
    Source: § 12.11(2.1), Political Parties Act, 1994 (amended 2014)

    In the event of failure to comply with a precept specified in clauses 1211(1) 1)-3), 5) and 6) of this Act, the political party funding supervision committee may impose a coercive payment of up to 15 000 euros in accordance with the procedure provided for in the Substitutive Enforcement and Coercive Payments Act.
    Source: § 12.12(1), Political Parties Act, 1994 (amended 2014)

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