Denmark

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Question Value
1. Is there a ban on donations from foreign interests to political parties?
  • CodeNo
  • Comment
  • Source
2. Is there a ban on donations from foreign interests to candidates?
  • CodeNo
  • Comment
  • Source
3. Is there a ban on corporate donations to political parties?
  • CodeNo
  • Comment
  • Source
4. Is there a ban on corporate donations to candidates?
  • CodeNo
  • Comment
  • Source
5. Is there a ban on donations from Trade Unions to political parties?
  • CodeNo
  • Comment
  • Source
6. Is there a ban on donations from Trade Unions to candidates?
  • CodeNo
  • Comment
  • Source
7. Is there a ban on anonymous donations to political parties?
  • CodeNo
  • Comment

    The identity of donors who contribute more than DKK 20,000 needs to be published, although the exact amount of the donations can remain undisclosed.

  • Source
8. Is there a ban on anonymous donations to candidates?
  • CodeNo
  • Comment

    The identity of donors who contribute more than DKK 20,000 needs to be published, although the exact amount of the donations can remain undisclosed.

  • Source
9. Is there a ban on donations from corporations with government contracts to political parties?
  • CodeNo
  • Comment
  • Source
10. Is there a ban on donations from corporations with government contracts to candidates?
  • CodeNo
  • Comment
  • Source
11. Is there a ban on donations from corporations with partial government ownership to political parties?
  • CodeNo
  • Comment
  • Source
12. Is there a ban on donations from corporations with partial government ownership to candidates?
  • CodeNo
  • Comment
  • Source
13. Is there a ban on the use of state resources in favour or against a political party or candidate?
  • CodeNo
  • Comment
  • Source
14. Is there a limit on the amount a donor can contribute to a political party during a non-election specific period?
  • CodeNo
  • Comment
  • Source
15. If there is a limit on the amount a donor can contribute to a political party during a non-election specific period, what is the limit?
  • CodeNot applicable
  • Comment
  • Source
16. Is there a limit on the amount a donor can contribute to a political party during an election?
  • CodeNo
  • Comment
  • Source
17. If there is a limit on the amount a donor can contribute to a political party during an election, what is the limit?
  • CodeNot applicable
  • Comment
  • Source
18. Is there a limit on the amount a donor can contribute to a candidate?
  • CodeNo
  • Comment
  • Source
19. If there is a limit on the amount a donor can contribute to a candidate, what is the limit?
  • CodeNot applicable
  • Comment
  • Source
20. Is there a limit on the amount a candidate can contribute to their own election campaign?
  • CodeNo
  • Comment
  • Source
21. Is there a limit on in-kind donations to political parties?
  • CodeNo
  • Comment
  • Source
22. Is there a limit on in-kind donations to candidates?
  • CodeNo
  • Comment
  • Source
23. Is there a ban on political parties engaging in commercial activities?
  • CodeNo
  • Comment
  • Source
24. Is there a ban on political parties taking loans in relation to election campaigns?
  • CodeNo
  • Comment
  • Source
25. Is there a ban on candidates taking loans in relation to election campaigns?
  • CodeNo
  • Comment
  • Source
26. Is there a ban on donors to political parties/candidates participating in public tender/procurement processes?
  • CodeNo
  • Comment
  • Source
27. Are there provisions requiring donations to go through the banking system?
  • CodeNo
  • Comment
  • Source

Question Value
28. Are there provisions for direct public funding to political parties?
  • CodeYes, regularly
  • Comment
  • Source

    Article 2.-(1) A party which participated in the most recently held general election shall be entitled to receive a grant in support of the party's political work in Denmark. The annual grant amounts to DKK 22.30 for each vote cast in favour of the party at the election, cf. however subsection (3). 

    (3) No grant shall be provided for parties and independent candidates in whose favour fewer than 1,000 votes were cast at the election.

    Article 4a.-(1) The amounts specified in sections 2(1) and (2), 3(1) and 4(1) are adjusted each year on January 1st by 2.0 per cent which is added to or deducted from the adjustment percentage for the relevant fiscal year, cf. the Rate Adjustment Percentage Act. The amount resulting from this calculation shall be rounded up to the nearest amount divisible by DKK 0.25.
    (2) The adjustment shall take place based on the amounts before rounding off prevailing at the time of adjustment

    Grants to Political Parties (Consolidation) Act, 2006.

29. What are the eligibility criteria for political parties to receive public funding?
  • CodeShare of votes in previous election
  • Comment

    Public funding is allocated at the national, regional and local level and the eligibility criteria depend on the type of election.

  • Source

    Article 2.-(1) A party which participated in the most recently held general election shall be entitled to receive a grant in support of the party's political work in Denmark. The annual grant amounts to DKK 22.30 for each vote cast in favour of the party at the election, cf. however subsection (3). 

    (3) No grant shall be provided for parties and independent candidates in whose favour fewer than 1,000 votes were cast at the election.

    Article 4a.-(1) The amounts specified in sections 2(1) and (2), 3(1) and 4(1) are adjusted each year on January 1st by 2.0 per cent which is added to or deducted from the adjustment percentage for the relevant fiscal year, cf. the Rate Adjustment Percentage Act. The amount resulting from this calculation shall be rounded up to the nearest amount divisible by DKK 0.25.
    (2) The adjustment shall take place based on the amounts before rounding off prevailing at the time of adjustment

    Grants to Political Parties (Consolidation) Act, 2006.

30. What is the allocation calculation for political parties to receive public funding?
  • CodeFlat rate by votes received
  • Comment
  • Source

    State support is provided for all parties and independent candidates that received at least 1,000 votes in the last parliamentary elections.

    OSCE/ODIHR (2015) Denmark,  Early General Elections, 18 June 2015 OSCE/ODIHR Needs Assessment Mission Report. OSCE/ODIHR, Warsaw.

    Parties and independent candidates, fulfilling the formal requirements for the annual public funding (2009), are entitled to receive DKK 26.50 (EUR 3.50) per vote obtained in the previous Folketing election, provided they received at least 1,000 votes in the election. Furthermore, political parties as well as independent lists of candidates, who participated in the most recent election to the county council, are entitled to DKK 3.75 (EUR 0.50) per vote received in the latest county council election, provided they obtained at least 500 votes. Lastly, political parties and independent lists of candidates, participating in the most recent election to the district council, are entitled to DKK 6.00 (EUR 0.80) per vote, provided that they obtained at least 100 votes in the district election or, regarding the district of the municipality of Copenhagen, at least 500 votes).

    GRECO (2009) Evaluation Report on Denmark on Transparency of Party Funding (Theme II), 2009, p.6.

31. What are the provisions on 'ear marking' direct public funding to political parties (how it should be used)?
  • CodeNo
  • Comment
  • Source

    The purpose of direct public funding is to support general administration and election campaign activities of political parties and candidates but this financing is “not earmarked” for any specific activities. However, they must be spent in Denmark.

    GRECO Evaluation Report on Denmark on Transparency of Party Funding (Theme II), 2009, p.6.

    However, public grants are to be used by political parties for political activities:

    Article (3) Grants provided under this Act shall be expended on political work in Denmark for the benefit of the grant recipient’s organisation or its members or for the benefit of other organisations in or outside the relevant area or for the benefit of the electorate in the relevant area.

    Grants to Political Parties (Consolidation) Act, 2006.

32. Are there provisions for free or subsidized access to media for political parties?
  • CodeYes
  • Comment
  • Source

    "Concerning indirect public funding, the only source provided in Denmark is free access to the public broadcast media during election campaigns. The guidelines of the "Danish Radio and Television" (a national public service station) aim at ensuring that all registered political parties are given equal access to pre-election programmes on radio and television. All parties (no matter how small) are given equal time free of charge to present their manifestos etc. to the public."

    GRECO (2009) Evaluation Report on Denmark on Transparency of Party Funding (Theme II), p.6.

33. What criteria determine allocation for free or subsidized access to media for political parties?
  • CodeEqual
  • Comment
  • Source

    "Concerning indirect public funding, the only source provided in Denmark is free access to the public broadcast media during election campaigns. The guidelines of the "Danish Radio and Television" (a national public service station) aim at ensuring that all registered political parties are given equal access to pre-election programmes on radio and television. All parties (no matter how small) are given equal time free of charge to present their manifestos etc. to the public."

    GRECO (2009) Evaluation Report on Denmark on Transparency of Party Funding (Theme II), p.6.

34. Are there provisions for free or subsidized access to media for candidates?
  • CodeNo
  • Comment

    Only to political parties.

  • Source
35. Are there provisions for any other form of indirect public funding?
  • CodeYes
  • Comment

    Political parties are subject to taxation in respect of their business activities and are, in this respect, subject to the regulations of the Corporation Tax Act. Other types of funding of political parties, whether public or private, are exempt from taxation.

    GRECO (2009) Evaluation Report on Denmark on Transparency of Party Funding (Theme II), 2009, p.7.

  • Source
36. Is the provision of direct public funding to political parties tied to gender equality among candidates?
  • CodeNo
  • Comment
  • Source
37. Are there provisions for other financial advantages to encourage gender equality in political parties?
  • CodeNo
  • Comment
  • Source

Question Value
38. Is there a ban on vote buying?
  • CodeYes
  • Comment
  • Source

    Article 117 Criminal Code.

     

39. Are there limits on the amount a political party can spend?
  • CodeNo
  • Comment
  • Source

    There are no restrictions regarding to what use the political parties may put their funds more than that they may only be used for political purpose.

    GRECO (2009) Evaluation Report on Denmark on Transparency of Party Funding (Theme II), p.7.

40. If there are limits on the amount a political party can spend, what is the limit?
  • CodeNot applicable
  • Comment
  • Source
41. Are there limits on the amount a candidate can spend?
  • CodeNo
  • Comment
  • Source
42. If there are limits on the amount a candidate can spend, what is the limit?
  • CodeNot applicable
  • Comment
  • Source
43. Are there limits on the amount that third parties can spend on election campaign activities?
  • CodeNo
  • Comment
  • Source
44. Are there limits on traditional media advertising spending in relation to election campaigns?
  • CodeYes, for political parties | Yes, for candidates | Yes, for third parties
  • Comment
  • Source

    In accordance with the Radio and Television Broadcasting Act, advertising by a range of public associations, including political parties, is prohibited on television. Additionally, television advertising of 'political messages' is prohibited in the period between the announcement of elections and election day. The OSCE/ODIHR NAM was informed that the term 'political messages' is interpreted broadly and includes messages that aim to promote public opinion on political matters. It is understood that this prohibition extends to advertising by organizations and unions, in which they express political views.15 Additionally, the law expressly prohibits sponsorship of all programs by political parties or other public associations, as well as any sponsorship of the news and current affairs programs on television and on the radio.

    OSCE/ODIHR (2015) Denmark,  Early General Elections, 18 June 2015 OSCE/ODIHR Needs Assessment Mission Report. OSCE/ODIHR, Warsaw.

45. Are there limits on online media advertising spending in relation to election campaigns?
  • CodeNo
  • Comment
  • Source

    Internet resources, including on-line editions of newspapers or broadcasters, are not regulated. They can, however, voluntarily register with the Press Council and become subject to the Media Liability Act.

    OSCE/ODIHR (2015) Denmark,  Early General Elections, 18 June 2015 OSCE/ODIHR Needs Assessment Mission Report. OSCE/ODIHR, Warsaw.

46. Do any other restrictions on online media advertisement (beyond limits) exist?
  • CodeNo
  • Comment
  • Source

    Internet resources, including on-line editions of newspapers or broadcasters, are not regulated. They can, however, voluntarily register with the Press Council and become subject to the Media Liability Act.

    OSCE/ODIHR (2015) Denmark,  Early General Elections, 18 June 2015 OSCE/ODIHR Needs Assessment Mission Report. OSCE/ODIHR, Warsaw.

Question Value
47. Do political parties have to report regularly on their finances?
  • CodeYes
  • Comment
  • Source

    Political parties with a nationwide organisation which have been registered for the national or European Parliament elections are obliged, within 12 months of the end of the accounting year, to submit their annual accounts (described above) to Parliament (Folketing) - (Section 5 - Private Contributions to Political Parties and Publication of Political Parties Accounts Act (2006)).

    Moreover, political parties that wish to apply for public funding have to submit their recent accounts before the end of the calendar year for which the grant is requested. The accounts are to be submitted to the Ministry for the Interior and Social Welfare together with the application for new funds (section 7b - Grants to Political Parties (Consolidation) Act, 2006). 

    GRECO (2009) Evaluation Report on Denmark on Transparency of Party Funding (Theme II), p.9.

     

48. Do political parties have to report on their election campaign finances?
  • CodeNo
  • Comment
  • Source
49. Do candidates have to report on their election campaign finances?
  • CodeYes
  • Comment
  • Source

    Individual candidates, who participated in the previous elections to the Folketing must - in order to obtain public funding - state the amount used for political purposes in the previous year. There are no other reporting obligations upon them.

    GRECO (2009) Evaluation Report on Denmark on Transparency of Party Funding (Theme II), p.9.

50. Do third parties have to report on election campaign finances?
  • CodeNo
  • Comment
  • Source
51. Is information in reports from political parties and/or candidates to be made public?
  • CodeYes
  • Comment
  • Source

    Political parties with a nationwide organisation which have been registered for the national or European Parliament elections are obliged, within 12 months of the end of the accounting year, to submit their annual accounts (described above) to Parliament (Folketing) - (Section 5 - Private Contributions to Political Parties and Publication of Political Parties Accounts Act (2006)).

    There are no general accounting obligations that party accounts and taxation documentation have to be publicly available. However, parties with a nationwide organisation which have been registered for the national or European Parliament elections, must submit their annual accounts to Parliament, which renders them public (section 5 APPA). The GET was informed that public access to these accounts is provided on-line on the homepage of the Folketing.

    GRECO (2009) Evaluation Report on Denmark on Transparency of Party Funding (Theme II), p.9.

     

52. Must reports from political parties and/or candidates reveal the identity of donors?
  • CodeSometimes
  • Comment

    The identities of donors who contribute more than 20,000 DKK need to be published. However, the exact amounts of the donations can remain undisclosed.

    OSCE/ODIHR (2015) Denmark,  Early General Elections, 18 June 2015 OSCE/ODIHR Needs Assessment Mission Report. OSCE/ODIHR, Warsaw.

    It is required that party accounts contain information on the name and address of any private contributor (physical or legal person) from whom the nationwide organisation during the accounting year has received one or more contributions which, in total, exceed DKK 20,000 (EUR 2 700) However, it is not required to report the specific value of such donations; the parties are only obliged to provide the total sum of all donations and a list of the donors. The accounts are also to contain a total sum of all anonymous contributions received during the accounting year and information on the size of any anonymous contribution exceeding DKK 20 000 (EUR 2 700). (Section 3 - Private Contributions to Political Parties and Publication of Political Parties Accounts Act (2006)).

    GRECO (2009) Evaluation Report on Denmark on Transparency of Party Funding (Theme II), p.8.

  • Source
53. Must reports from political parties and/or candidates include information on itemized income?
  • CodeNo
  • Comment

    The party accounting rules follow largely the general accounting rules for any legal person: The purpose or nature of the contributions does not have to be specified in the accounts nor is it required that the accounts make a distinction between regular income on the one hand, and income relating to election campaigns on the other hand. Neither is it required that income for different election campaigns running in parallel be distinguished from each other in the accounts.

    The Accounts of Political Parties Act does not contain any requirements concerning which expenditures are to be included in the accounts or the level of detail. The only requirement in this respect is that the accounts must contain information about the total expenditure; balance and the net worth (section 3, subsection 3 - Private Contributions to Political Parties and Publication of Political Parties Accounts Act (2006)).

    GRECO (2009) Evaluation Report on Denmark on Transparency of Party Funding (Theme II), p.8.

  • Source
54. Must reports from political parties and/or candidates include information on itemized spending?
  • CodeNo
  • Comment
  • Source

    The party accounting rules follow largely the general accounting rules for any legal person: The purpose or nature of the contributions does not have to be specified in the accounts nor is it required that the accounts make a distinction between regular income on the one hand, and income relating to election campaigns on the other hand. Neither is it required that income for different election campaigns running in parallel be distinguished from each other in the accounts.

    The Accounts of Political Parties Act does not contain any requirements concerning which expenditures are to be included in the accounts or the level of detail. The only requirement in this respect is that the accounts must contain information about the total expenditure; balance and the net worth (section 3, subsection 3 - Private Contributions to Political Parties and Publication of Political Parties Accounts Act (2006)).

    GRECO (2009) Evaluation Report on Denmark on Transparency of Party Funding (Theme II), p.8.

55. Which institution(s) receives financial reports from political parties and/or candidates?
  • CodeMinistry | Parliamentary unit
  • Comment

    Parliament and Ministry for the Interior and Social Welfare.

  • Source

    Political parties with a nationwide organisation which have been registered for the national or European Parliament elections are obliged, within 12 months of the end of the accounting year, to submit their annual accounts (described above) to Parliament (Folketing) - (Section 5 - Private Contributions to Political Parties and Publication of Political Parties Accounts Act (2006)).

    Moreover, political parties that wish to apply for public funding have to submit their recent accounts before the end of the calendar year for which the grant is requested. The accounts are to be submitted to the Ministry for the Interior and Social Welfare together with the application for new funds (section 7b - Grants to Political Parties (Consolidation) Act, 2006). 

    GRECO (2009) Evaluation Report on Denmark on Transparency of Party Funding (Theme II), 2009, p.9.

56. Which institution(s) is responsible for examining financial reports and/or investigating violations?
  • CodeNo institution specified
  • Comment
  • Source

    There is no specific authority in Denmark entrusted with monitoring the adherence to political financing rules by political parties, related entities or election candidates and there is no public authority established to check the relevant accounting records of such entities and persons. However, the General Audit Office (Rigsrevisionen), which is an independent institution under Parliament, examines the soundness of all state accounts, i.e. checks that they are without significant errors and deficiencies and this Office is, according to the Grants to Political Parties (Consolidation) Act (Section 7c), authorised to demand accounting records from the beneficiary parties that have received public funding in order to examine how such funding has been spent and, in this context, may check the accounts of political parties.

    GRECO (2009) Evaluation Report on Denmark on Transparency of Party Funding (Theme II), p.10.

57. What power is granted to the institution(s) responsible for examining reports and/or investigating violations?
  • CodeNot applicable
  • Comment
  • Source

    There is no specific authority in Denmark entrusted with monitoring the adherence to political financing rules by political parties, related entities or election candidates and there is no public authority established to check the relevant accounting records of such entities and persons. However, the General Audit Office (Rigsrevisionen), which is an independent institution under Parliament, examines the soundness of all state accounts, i.e. checks that they are without significant errors and deficiencies and this Office is, according to the Grants to Political Parties (Consolidation) Act (Section 7c), authorised to demand accounting records from the beneficiary parties that have received public funding in order to examine how such funding has been spent and, in this context, may check the accounts of political parties.

    GRECO (2009) Evaluation Report on Denmark on Transparency of Party Funding (Theme II), p.10.

58. What sanctions are provided for political finance infractions?
  • CodeFines | Prison | Loss of public funding
  • Comment
  • Source

    The particular legislation on political financing in Denmark is connected to sanctions, i.e. both the Accounts of Political Parties Act and the Public Funding Act contain sanctions in case political parties, their representatives or election candidates provide incorrect or insufficient information. The sanctions comprise a fine or imprisonment of up to 4 months and can, similar to any other offence (for example bookkeeping offences under the Criminal Code) only be imposed by a court of law following the ordinary criminal law procedure. Furthermore, the failure to submit the annual accounts in the request for public funding will lead to the non provision of such funding.

    GRECO (2009) Evaluation Report on Denmark on Transparency of Party Funding (Theme II), p.15.

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