San Marino

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Question Value
1. Is there a ban on donations from foreign interests to political parties?
  • CodeNo
  • Comment

    BLANK

  • Source

    While there is no ceiling on private contributions from individuals or legal entities, most parties met with by the OSCE/ODIHR NAM stated that they will rely mostly on public funds.
    Source: OSCE/ODIHR (2016), Republic of San Marino, Early Parliamentary Elections, 20 November 2016, OSCE/ODIHR Needs Assessment Mission Report, OSCE/ODIHR, Warsaw

    There is no ceiling on private contributions to political parties, or on how much the latter can raise from private sources.
    Source: GRECO (2016), Third Evaluation Round, Evaluation Report on San Marino, Transparency of Party Funding, (Theme II), GRECO, Strasbourg

2. Is there a ban on donations from foreign interests to candidates?
  • CodeNo
  • Comment

    BLANK

  • Source

    While there is no ceiling on private contributions from individuals or legal entities, most parties met with by the OSCE/ODIHR NAM stated that they will rely mostly on public funds.
    Source: OSCE/ODIHR (2016), Republic of San Marino, Early Parliamentary Elections, 20 November 2016, OSCE/ODIHR Needs Assessment Mission Report, OSCE/ODIHR, Warsaw

    There is no ceiling on private contributions to political parties, or on how much the latter can raise from private sources.
    Source: GRECO (2016), Third Evaluation Round, Evaluation Report on San Marino, Transparency of Party Funding, (Theme II), GRECO, Strasbourg

3. Is there a ban on corporate donations to political parties?
  • CodeNo
  • Comment

    BLANK

  • Source

    While there is no ceiling on private contributions from individuals or legal entities, most parties met with by the OSCE/ODIHR NAM stated that they will rely mostly on public funds.
    Source: OSCE/ODIHR (2016), Republic of San Marino, Early Parliamentary Elections, 20 November 2016, OSCE/ODIHR Needs Assessment Mission Report, OSCE/ODIHR, Warsaw

    There is no ceiling on private contributions to political parties, or on how much the latter can raise from private sources.
    Source: GRECO (2016), Third Evaluation Round, Evaluation Report on San Marino, Transparency of Party Funding, (Theme II), GRECO, Strasbourg

4. Is there a ban on corporate donations to candidates?
  • CodeNo
  • Comment

    BLANK

  • Source

    While there is no ceiling on private contributions from individuals or legal entities, most parties met with by the OSCE/ODIHR NAM stated that they will rely mostly on public funds.
    Source: OSCE/ODIHR (2016), Republic of San Marino, Early Parliamentary Elections, 20 November 2016, OSCE/ODIHR Needs Assessment Mission Report, OSCE/ODIHR, Warsaw

    There is no ceiling on private contributions to political parties, or on how much the latter can raise from private sources.
    Source: GRECO (2016), Third Evaluation Round, Evaluation Report on San Marino, Transparency of Party Funding, (Theme II), GRECO, Strasbourg

5. Is there a ban on donations from Trade Unions to political parties?
  • CodeNo
  • Comment

    BLANK

  • Source

    While there is no ceiling on private contributions from individuals or legal entities, most parties met with by the OSCE/ODIHR NAM stated that they will rely mostly on public funds.
    Source: OSCE/ODIHR (2016), Republic of San Marino, Early Parliamentary Elections, 20 November 2016, OSCE/ODIHR Needs Assessment Mission Report, OSCE/ODIHR, Warsaw

    There is no ceiling on private contributions to political parties, or on how much the latter can raise from private sources.
    Source: GRECO (2016), Third Evaluation Round, Evaluation Report on San Marino, Transparency of Party Funding, (Theme II), GRECO, Strasbourg

6. Is there a ban on donations from Trade Unions to candidates?
  • CodeNo
  • Comment

    BLANK

  • Source

    While there is no ceiling on private contributions from individuals or legal entities, most parties met with by the OSCE/ODIHR NAM stated that they will rely mostly on public funds.
    Source: OSCE/ODIHR (2016), Republic of San Marino, Early Parliamentary Elections, 20 November 2016, OSCE/ODIHR Needs Assessment Mission Report, OSCE/ODIHR, Warsaw

    There is no ceiling on private contributions to political parties, or on how much the latter can raise from private sources.
    Source: GRECO (2016), Third Evaluation Round, Evaluation Report on San Marino, Transparency of Party Funding, (Theme II), GRECO, Strasbourg

7. Is there a ban on anonymous donations to political parties?
  • CodeYes
  • Comment

    BLANK

  • Source

    While anonymous donations are prohibited, there are no rules concerning other sources of campaign finance, including in-kind donations, loans, and media discounts.
    Source: OSCE/ODIHR (2016), Republic of San Marino, Early Parliamentary Elections, 20 November 2016, OSCE/ODIHR Needs Assessment Mission Report, OSCE/ODIHR, Warsaw

    Anonymous donations are prohibited (Article 13 LFPPM). That said, anonymous small contributions are allowed to be collected in transparent containers during conventions, festivals and events, and those amounts are reported under a relevant budget item.
    Source: GRECO (2016), Third Evaluation Round, Evaluation Report on San Marino, Transparency of Party Funding, (Theme II), GRECO, Strasbourg

8. Is there a ban on anonymous donations to candidates?
  • CodeYes
  • Comment

    BLANK

  • Source

    While anonymous donations are prohibited, there are no rules concerning other sources of campaign finance, including in-kind donations, loans, and media discounts.
    Source: OSCE/ODIHR (2016), Republic of San Marino, Early Parliamentary Elections, 20 November 2016, OSCE/ODIHR Needs Assessment Mission Report, OSCE/ODIHR, Warsaw

    Anonymous donations are prohibited (Article 13 LFPPM). That said, anonymous small contributions are allowed to be collected in transparent containers during conventions, festivals and events, and those amounts are reported under a relevant budget item.
    Source: GRECO (2016), Third Evaluation Round, Evaluation Report on San Marino, Transparency of Party Funding, (Theme II), GRECO, Strasbourg

9. Is there a ban on donations from corporations with government contracts to political parties?
  • CodeNo
  • Comment

    BLANK

  • Source

    While there is no ceiling on private contributions from individuals or legal entities, most parties met with by the OSCE/ODIHR NAM stated that they will rely mostly on public funds.
    Source: OSCE/ODIHR (2016), Republic of San Marino, Early Parliamentary Elections, 20 November 2016, OSCE/ODIHR Needs Assessment Mission Report, OSCE/ODIHR, Warsaw

    There is no ceiling on private contributions to political parties, or on how much the latter can raise from private sources.
    Source: GRECO (2016), Third Evaluation Round, Evaluation Report on San Marino, Transparency of Party Funding, (Theme II), GRECO, Strasbourg

10. Is there a ban on donations from corporations with government contracts to candidates?
  • CodeNo
  • Comment

    BLANK

  • Source

    While there is no ceiling on private contributions from individuals or legal entities, most parties met with by the OSCE/ODIHR NAM stated that they will rely mostly on public funds.
    Source: OSCE/ODIHR (2016), Republic of San Marino, Early Parliamentary Elections, 20 November 2016, OSCE/ODIHR Needs Assessment Mission Report, OSCE/ODIHR, Warsaw

    There is no ceiling on private contributions to political parties, or on how much the latter can raise from private sources.
    Source: GRECO (2016), Third Evaluation Round, Evaluation Report on San Marino, Transparency of Party Funding, (Theme II), GRECO, Strasbourg

11. Is there a ban on donations from corporations with partial government ownership to political parties?
  • CodeNo
  • Comment

    BLANK

  • Source

    While there is no ceiling on private contributions from individuals or legal entities, most parties met with by the OSCE/ODIHR NAM stated that they will rely mostly on public funds.
    Source: OSCE/ODIHR (2016), Republic of San Marino, Early Parliamentary Elections, 20 November 2016, OSCE/ODIHR Needs Assessment Mission Report, OSCE/ODIHR, Warsaw

    There is no ceiling on private contributions to political parties, or on how much the latter can raise from private sources.
    Source: GRECO (2016), Third Evaluation Round, Evaluation Report on San Marino, Transparency of Party Funding, (Theme II), GRECO, Strasbourg

12. Is there a ban on donations from corporations with partial government ownership to candidates?
  • CodeYes
  • Comment

    BLANK

  • Source

    While there is no ceiling on private contributions from individuals or legal entities, most parties met with by the OSCE/ODIHR NAM stated that they will rely mostly on public funds.
    Source: OSCE/ODIHR (2016), Republic of San Marino, Early Parliamentary Elections, 20 November 2016, OSCE/ODIHR Needs Assessment Mission Report, OSCE/ODIHR, Warsaw

    There is no ceiling on private contributions to political parties, or on how much the latter can raise from private sources.
    Source: GRECO (2016), Third Evaluation Round, Evaluation Report on San Marino, Transparency of Party Funding, (Theme II), GRECO, Strasbourg

13. Is there a ban on the use of state resources in favour or against a political party or candidate?
  • CodeNo data
  • Comment
  • Source
14. Is there a limit on the amount a donor can contribute to a political party during a non-election specific period?
  • CodeNo
  • Comment

    BLANK

  • Source

    While there is no ceiling on private contributions from individuals or legal entities, most parties met with by the OSCE/ODIHR NAM stated that they will rely mostly on public funds.
    Source: OSCE/ODIHR (2016), Republic of San Marino, Early Parliamentary Elections, 20 November 2016, OSCE/ODIHR Needs Assessment Mission Report, OSCE/ODIHR, Warsaw

    There is no ceiling on private contributions to political parties, or on how much the latter can raise from private sources.
    Source: GRECO (2016), Third Evaluation Round, Evaluation Report on San Marino, Transparency of Party Funding, (Theme II), GRECO, Strasbourg

15. If there is a limit on the amount a donor can contribute to a political party during a non-election specific period, what is the limit?
  • CodeNot applicable
  • Comment
  • Source
16. Is there a limit on the amount a donor can contribute to a political party during an election?
  • CodeNo
  • Comment

    BLANK

  • Source

    While there is no ceiling on private contributions from individuals or legal entities, most parties met with by the OSCE/ODIHR NAM stated that they will rely mostly on public funds.
    Source: OSCE/ODIHR (2016), Republic of San Marino, Early Parliamentary Elections, 20 November 2016, OSCE/ODIHR Needs Assessment Mission Report, OSCE/ODIHR, Warsaw

    There is no ceiling on private contributions to political parties, or on how much the latter can raise from private sources.
    Source: GRECO (2016), Third Evaluation Round, Evaluation Report on San Marino, Transparency of Party Funding, (Theme II), GRECO, Strasbourg

17. If there is a limit on the amount a donor can contribute to a political party during an election, what is the limit?
  • CodeNot applicable
  • Comment
  • Source
18. Is there a limit on the amount a donor can contribute to a candidate?
  • CodeNo
  • Comment

    BLANK

  • Source

    While there is no ceiling on private contributions from individuals or legal entities, most parties met with by the OSCE/ODIHR NAM stated that they will rely mostly on public funds.
    Source: OSCE/ODIHR (2016), Republic of San Marino, Early Parliamentary Elections, 20 November 2016, OSCE/ODIHR Needs Assessment Mission Report, OSCE/ODIHR, Warsaw

    There is no ceiling on private contributions to political parties, or on how much the latter can raise from private sources.
    Source: GRECO (2016), Third Evaluation Round, Evaluation Report on San Marino, Transparency of Party Funding, (Theme II), GRECO, Strasbourg

19. If there is a limit on the amount a donor can contribute to a candidate, what is the limit?
  • CodeNot applicable
  • Comment
  • Source
20. Is there a limit on the amount a candidate can contribute to their own election campaign?
  • CodeNo
  • Comment

    BLANK

  • Source

    While there is no ceiling on private contributions from individuals or legal entities, most parties met with by the OSCE/ODIHR NAM stated that they will rely mostly on public funds.
    Source: OSCE/ODIHR (2016), Republic of San Marino, Early Parliamentary Elections, 20 November 2016, OSCE/ODIHR Needs Assessment Mission Report, OSCE/ODIHR, Warsaw

    There is no ceiling on private contributions to political parties, or on how much the latter can raise from private sources.
    Source: GRECO (2016), Third Evaluation Round, Evaluation Report on San Marino, Transparency of Party Funding, (Theme II), GRECO, Strasbourg

21. Is there a limit on in-kind donations to political parties?
  • CodeNo
  • Comment

    BLANK

  • Source

    While anonymous donations are prohibited, there are no rules concerning other sources of campaign finance, including in-kind donations, loans, and media discounts
    Source: OSCE/ODIHR (2016), Republic of San Marino, Early Parliamentary Elections, 20 November 2016, OSCE/ODIHR Needs Assessment Mission Report, OSCE/ODIHR, Warsaw

22. Is there a limit on in-kind donations to candidates?
  • CodeNo
  • Comment

    BLANK

  • Source

    While anonymous donations are prohibited, there are no rules concerning other sources of campaign finance, including in-kind donations, loans, and media discounts
    Source: OSCE/ODIHR (2016), Republic of San Marino, Early Parliamentary Elections, 20 November 2016, OSCE/ODIHR Needs Assessment Mission Report, OSCE/ODIHR, Warsaw

23. Is there a ban on political parties engaging in commercial activities?
  • CodeNo
  • Comment

    BLANK

  • Source

    While there is no ceiling on private contributions from individuals or legal entities, most parties met with by the OSCE/ODIHR NAM stated that they will rely mostly on public funds.
    Source: OSCE/ODIHR (2016), Republic of San Marino, Early Parliamentary Elections, 20 November 2016, OSCE/ODIHR Needs Assessment Mission Report, OSCE/ODIHR, Warsaw

    There is no ceiling on private contributions to political parties, or on how much the latter can raise from private sources.
    Source: GRECO (2016), Third Evaluation Round, Evaluation Report on San Marino, Transparency of Party Funding, (Theme II), GRECO, Strasbourg

24. Is there a ban on political parties taking loans in relation to election campaigns?
  • CodeNo
  • Comment

    BLANK

  • Source

    While anonymous donations are prohibited, there are no rules concerning other sources of campaign finance, including in-kind donations, loans, and media discounts.
    Source: OSCE/ODIHR (2016), Republic of San Marino, Early Parliamentary Elections, 20 November 2016, OSCE/ODIHR Needs Assessment Mission Report, OSCE/ODIHR, Warsaw

    There is no ceiling on private contributions to political parties, or on how much the latter can raise from private sources.
    Source: GRECO (2016), Third Evaluation Round, Evaluation Report on San Marino, Transparency of Party Funding, (Theme II), GRECO, Strasbourg

25. Is there a ban on candidates taking loans in relation to election campaigns?
  • CodeNo
  • Comment

    BLANK

  • Source

    While anonymous donations are prohibited, there are no rules concerning other sources of campaign finance, including in-kind donations, loans, and media discounts.
    Source: OSCE/ODIHR (2016), Republic of San Marino, Early Parliamentary Elections, 20 November 2016, OSCE/ODIHR Needs Assessment Mission Report, OSCE/ODIHR, Warsaw

    There is no ceiling on private contributions to political parties, or on how much the latter can raise from private sources.
    Source: GRECO (2016), Third Evaluation Round, Evaluation Report on San Marino, Transparency of Party Funding, (Theme II), GRECO, Strasbourg

26. Is there a ban on donors to political parties/candidates participating in public tender/procurement processes?
  • CodeNo data
  • Comment
  • Source
27. Are there provisions requiring donations to go through the banking system?
  • CodeNo
  • Comment

    BLANK

  • Source

    34. Identification data of each person providing a donation to a political party or movement, irrespective of the value of such a donation, must be entered in a specific register, which is to be kept together with accounting records.
    35. Contributions amounting to over 3 000 € in a calendar year must be evidenced by a relevant document attached to the balance sheet and containing also the identification data of donors.
    36. As highlighted before, it is possible to collect small amounts from individual donors during conferences, festivals, rallies and other events promoted by a political party/movement. In those cases, while it is not required to track the identity of the individual donor because of the low value of his/her respective contribution, it is nevertheless mandatory to specify the total amount of the anonymous donations collected in the parties’ financial accounts (Article 13, Law No. 170/2005).
    Source: GRECO (2016), Third Evaluation Round, Evaluation Report on San Marino, Transparency of Party Funding, (Theme II), GRECO, Strasbourg

Question Value
28. Are there provisions for direct public funding to political parties?
  • CodeYes, both regularly provided funding and in relation to campaigns
  • Comment

    BLANK

  • Source

     Political parties rely largely on public funds and receive annual subsidies in proportion to their parliamentary representation. The subsidy is doubled in an election year to provide additional funds for campaigning.
    Source: OSCE/ODIHR (2016), Republic of San Marino, Early Parliamentary Elections, 20 November 2016, OSCE/ODIHR Needs Assessment Mission Report, OSCE/ODIHR, Warsaw

    The State provides an annual subsidy to political parties, proportional to their parliamentary representation: [...] The annual subsidy is a fixed proportional share of the State budget; it is doubled when in an election year (Articles 2 and 5, Law No 170/2005).
    Source: GRECO (2016), Third Evaluation Round, Evaluation Report on San Marino, Transparency of Party Funding, (Theme II), GRECO, Strasbourg

29. What are the eligibility criteria for political parties to receive public funding?
  • CodeRepresentation in elected body | Share of seats in previous election | Participation in election
  • Comment

    BLANK

  • Source

    Political parties rely largely on public funds and receive annual subsidies in proportion to their parliamentary representation. The subsidy is doubled in an election year to provide additional funds for campaigning.
    Source: OSCE/ODIHR (2016), Republic of San Marino, Early Parliamentary Elections, 20 November 2016, OSCE/ODIHR Needs Assessment Mission Report, OSCE/ODIHR, Warsaw

    The State provides an annual subsidy to political parties, proportional to their parliamentary representation: 75% of this funding is allocated in proportion to the number of elected parliamentarians in the respective lists, while 25% is allocated in equal fixed shares among the parties and movements represented by at least three parliamentarians. Parties and movements whose lists have obtained less than three seats are entitled to a fixed funding of 12 000 € each. [...] The annual subsidy is a fixed proportional share of the State budget; it is doubled when in an election year (Articles 2 and 5, Law No 170/2005).
    Source: GRECO (2016), Third Evaluation Round, Evaluation Report on San Marino, Transparency of Party Funding, (Theme II), GRECO, Strasbourg

30. What is the allocation calculation for political parties to receive public funding?
  • CodeProportional to seats received
  • Comment

    BLANK

  • Source

    Political parties rely largely on public funds and receive annual subsidies in proportion to their parliamentary representation. The subsidy is doubled in an election year to provide additional funds for campaigning.
    Source: OSCE/ODIHR (2016), Republic of San Marino, Early Parliamentary Elections, 20 November 2016, OSCE/ODIHR Needs Assessment Mission Report, OSCE/ODIHR, Warsaw

    The State provides an annual subsidy to political parties, proportional to their parliamentary representation: 75% of this funding is allocated in proportion to the number of elected parliamentarians in the respective lists, while 25% is allocated in equal fixed shares among the parties and movements represented by at least three parliamentarians. Parties and movements whose lists have obtained less than three seats are entitled to a fixed funding of 12 000 € each. [...] The annual subsidy is a fixed proportional share of the State budget; it is doubled when in an election year (Articles 2 and 5, Law No 170/2005).
    Source: GRECO (2016), Third Evaluation Round, Evaluation Report on San Marino, Transparency of Party Funding, (Theme II), GRECO, Strasbourg

31. What are the provisions on 'ear marking' direct public funding to political parties (how it should be used)?
  • CodeNo data
  • Comment
  • Source
32. Are there provisions for free or subsidized access to media for political parties?
  • CodeYes
  • Comment

    BLANK

  • Source

    During the election campaign, San Marino RTV is obliged to provide equal access and free airtime to all candidate lists. Details of coverage are agreed upon in advance with representatives of all candidate lists.
    Source: OSCE/ODIHR (2016), Republic of San Marino, Early Parliamentary Elections, 20 November 2016, OSCE/ODIHR Needs Assessment Mission Report, OSCE/ODIHR, Warsaw

    The State television and the media broadcast supplementary and complementary information programmes – whose slots are equally divided among contesting parties – and provide media access to political parties/movements at reduced costs.
    Source: GRECO (2016), Third Evaluation Round, Evaluation Report on San Marino, Transparency of Party Funding, (Theme II), GRECO, Strasbourg

33. What criteria determine allocation for free or subsidized access to media for political parties?
  • CodeEqual
  • Comment

    BLANK

  • Source

    During the election campaign, San Marino RTV is obliged to provide equal access and free airtime to all candidate lists. Details of coverage are agreed upon in advance with representatives of all candidate lists.
    Source: OSCE/ODIHR (2016), Republic of San Marino, Early Parliamentary Elections, 20 November 2016, OSCE/ODIHR Needs Assessment Mission Report, OSCE/ODIHR, Warsaw

    The State television and the media broadcast supplementary and complementary information programmes – whose slots are equally divided among contesting parties – and provide media access to political parties/movements at reduced costs.
    Source: GRECO (2016), Third Evaluation Round, Evaluation Report on San Marino, Transparency of Party Funding, (Theme II), GRECO, Strasbourg

34. Are there provisions for free or subsidized access to media for candidates?
  • CodeYes
  • Comment

    BLANK

  • Source

    During the election campaign, San Marino RTV is obliged to provide equal access and free airtime to all candidate lists. Details of coverage are agreed upon in advance with representatives of all candidate lists.
    Source: OSCE/ODIHR (2016), Republic of San Marino, Early Parliamentary Elections, 20 November 2016, OSCE/ODIHR Needs Assessment Mission Report, OSCE/ODIHR, Warsaw

35. Are there provisions for any other form of indirect public funding?
  • CodeTax relief | Space for campaign materials | Premises for campaign meetings | Free or subsidised postage cost
  • Comment

    BLANK

  • Source

    On the occasion of general elections, administrative elections or referenda, public spaces are provided for political parties/movements/committees/civil lists to affix, free of charge and on an equal basis, campaign posters and materials. Likewise, they are entitled to free use of State facilities, limited to specific time slots, beyond which a symbolic daily fee applies.[...]
    Political parties pay only 50% of the usual postal charges. [...]
    Political parties are exempted from taxes on profits earned in the course of the year. Donors are entitled to tax relief for contributions made to associations and non-profit entities, including political parties, up to a maximum of 1 600 € (Article 14(1)c, Law No. 166 of 6 December 2013 on General Income Tax).
    Source: GRECO (2016), Third Evaluation Round, Evaluation Report on San Marino, Transparency of Party Funding, (Theme II), GRECO, Strasbourg

36. Is the provision of direct public funding to political parties tied to gender equality among candidates?
  • CodeNo data
  • Comment
  • Source
37. Are there provisions for other financial advantages to encourage gender equality in political parties?
  • CodeNo data
  • Comment
  • Source

Question Value
38. Is there a ban on vote buying?
  • CodeYes
  • Comment

    BLANK

  • Source

    Art. 394
    (Offence against the free expression of the right to vote)
    Anyone who, during State elections, uses violence, threat or deceit, or offers or promises undue benefits, reimbursements or subsidies for travel and accommodation expenses, to push a citizen to sign a declaration in support of a candidate, draft law, or referendum, or to abstain or not from voting, or to vote for a candidate or symbol, is punished with third-degree imprisonment and fourth-degree loss of political rights.
    The same sanction applies to citizens that accepts undue benefits, reimbursements or subsidies referred to in the previous comma, except in case of useful and spontaneous confession.
    If the offence is committed by a person exercising public duties, by a public official, or by a clergyman, if abusing of their attributions and during the performance of their duties, they are subject to fourth-degree imprisonment and to fourth-degree loss of political rights and forfeiture of public offices, increased according to Art. 93.

    Source: Art. 394, Criminal Code on Electoral Matters

39. Are there limits on the amount a political party can spend?
  • CodeYes
  • Comment

    BLANK

  • Source

    A spending limit for each list is in place, which should not exceed the public funds given to the largest group in parliament, some EUR 630,000 for these elections.
    Source: OSCE/ODIHR (2016), Republic of San Marino, Early Parliamentary Elections, 20 November 2016, OSCE/ODIHR Needs Assessment Mission Report, OSCE/ODIHR, Warsaw

    Each list participating in elections is subject to a limit of expenses which should not exceed 100% of the contribution given to the largest group in Parliament (Article 20(1), Electoral Law). For example, in the latest elections, such a threshold totalled around 600 000 €.
    Source: GRECO (2016), Third Evaluation Round, Evaluation Report on San Marino, Transparency of Party Funding, (Theme II), GRECO, Strasbourg

40. If there are limits on the amount a political party can spend, what is the limit?
  • Code It cannot exceed the public funds given to the largest group in parliament, some EUR 630,000 for 2016 elections.
  • Comment

    BLANK

  • Source

    Source: OSCE/ODIHR (2016), Republic of San Marino, Early Parliamentary Elections, 20 November 2016, OSCE/ODIHR Needs Assessment Mission Report, OSCE/ODIHR, Warsaw

    Each list participating in elections is subject to a limit of expenses which should not exceed 100% of the contribution given to the largest group in Parliament (Article 20(1), Electoral Law). For example, in the latest elections, such a threshold totalled around 600 000 €.
    Source: GRECO (2016), Third Evaluation Round, Evaluation Report on San Marino, Transparency of Party Funding, (Theme II), GRECO, Strasbourg

41. Are there limits on the amount a candidate can spend?
  • CodeYes
  • Comment

    BLANK

  • Source

    A spending limit for each list is in place, which should not exceed the public funds given to the largest group in parliament, some EUR 630,000 for these elections.
    Source: OSCE/ODIHR (2016), Republic of San Marino, Early Parliamentary Elections, 20 November 2016, OSCE/ODIHR Needs Assessment Mission Report, OSCE/ODIHR, Warsaw

    Each list participating in elections is subject to a limit of expenses which should not exceed 100% of the contribution given to the largest group in Parliament (Article 20(1), Electoral Law). For example, in the latest elections, such a threshold totalled around 600 000 €.
    Source: GRECO (2016), Third Evaluation Round, Evaluation Report on San Marino, Transparency of Party Funding, (Theme II), GRECO, Strasbourg

42. If there are limits on the amount a candidate can spend, what is the limit?
  • Code It cannot exceed the public funds given to the largest group in parliament, some EUR 630,000 for 2016 elections.
  • Comment

    BLANK

  • Source

    A spending limit for each list is in place, which should not exceed the public funds given to the largest group in parliament, some EUR 630,000 for these elections.
    Source: OSCE/ODIHR (2016), Republic of San Marino, Early Parliamentary Elections, 20 November 2016, OSCE/ODIHR Needs Assessment Mission Report, OSCE/ODIHR, Warsaw

    Each list participating in elections is subject to a limit of expenses which should not exceed 100% of the contribution given to the largest group in Parliament (Article 20(1), Electoral Law). For example, in the latest elections, such a threshold totalled around 600 000 €.
    Source: GRECO (2016), Third Evaluation Round, Evaluation Report on San Marino, Transparency of Party Funding, (Theme II), GRECO, Strasbourg

43. Are there limits on the amount that third parties can spend on election campaign activities?
  • CodeNo
  • Comment

    There are no regulations regarding third parties spending.

  • Source

    Source: Law on Financing Political Parties and Political Movements (Law No. 170/2005). 2005

44. Are there limits on traditional media advertising spending in relation to election campaigns?
  • CodeNo
  • Comment

    BLANK

  • Source

    [...] there are no rules concerning other sources of campaign finance, including in-kind donations, loans, and media discounts.
    Source: OSCE/ODIHR (2016), Republic of San Marino, Early Parliamentary Elections, 20 November 2016, OSCE/ODIHR Needs Assessment Mission Report, OSCE/ODIHR, Warsaw

45. Are there limits on online media advertising spending in relation to election campaigns?
  • CodeNo
  • Comment

    BLANK

  • Source

    [...] there are no rules concerning other sources of campaign finance, including in-kind donations, loans, and media discounts.
    Source: OSCE/ODIHR (2016), Republic of San Marino, Early Parliamentary Elections, 20 November 2016, OSCE/ODIHR Needs Assessment Mission Report, OSCE/ODIHR, Warsaw

46. Do any other restrictions on online media advertisement (beyond limits) exist?
  • CodeNo
  • Comment

    BLANK

  • Source

    [...] there are no rules concerning other sources of campaign finance, including in-kind donations, loans, and media discounts.
    Source: OSCE/ODIHR (2016), Republic of San Marino, Early Parliamentary Elections, 20 November 2016, OSCE/ODIHR Needs Assessment Mission Report, OSCE/ODIHR, Warsaw

Question Value
47. Do political parties have to report regularly on their finances?
  • CodeYes
  • Comment

    BLANK

  • Source

    Political parties must report on their expenses and contributions annually, including those related to election campaigns.
    Source: OSCE/ODIHR (2016), Republic of San Marino, Early Parliamentary Elections, 20 November 2016, OSCE/ODIHR Needs Assessment Mission Report, OSCE/ODIHR, Warsaw

    Political parties/movements are required to file their balance sheet with the Institutional Secretariat by 30 April of each year; the Institutional Secretariat is to make this information public through the press (Article 8, LFPPM).
    Source: GRECO (2016), Third Evaluation Round, Evaluation Report on San Marino, Transparency of Party Funding, (Theme II), GRECO, Strasbourg

48. Do political parties have to report on their election campaign finances?
  • CodeNo
  • Comment

    Political party reports on its campaign finances in frame of annual report.

  • Source

    Political parties must report on their expenses and contributions annually, including those related to election campaigns.
    Source: OSCE/ODIHR (2016), Republic of San Marino, Early Parliamentary Elections, 20 November 2016, OSCE/ODIHR Needs Assessment Mission Report, OSCE/ODIHR, Warsaw

49. Do candidates have to report on their election campaign finances?
  • CodeNo
  • Comment

    BLANK

  • Source

    However, there is no requirement for candidates or representatives of lists to disclose their campaign income and expenditure prior to election day.
    Source: OSCE/ODIHR (2016), Republic of San Marino, Early Parliamentary Elections, 20 November 2016, OSCE/ODIHR Needs Assessment Mission Report, OSCE/ODIHR, Warsaw

50. Do third parties have to report on election campaign finances?
  • CodeSometimes
  • Comment

    BLANK

  • Source

    Accounting obligations for foundations, associations and non-profit organisations (whether related to political parties or not) are set forth in Article 37 of Law No. 129/2010 for associations and Law No. 101/2015 for foundations, respectively. In particular, they are required to register data and information related to their financing, including funds received, as well as to report on their use. This information is to be kept for five years.Source: GRECO (2016), Third Evaluation Round, Evaluation Report on San Marino, Transparency of Party Funding, (Theme II), GRECO, Strasbourg

     

51. Is information in reports from political parties and/or candidates to be made public?
  • CodeSometimes
  • Comment

    Only in case of annual report of political parties.

  • Source

    However, there is no requirement for candidates or representatives of lists to disclose their campaign income and expenditure prior to election day.
    Source: OSCE/ODIHR (2016), Republic of San Marino, Early Parliamentary Elections, 20 November 2016, OSCE/ODIHR Needs Assessment Mission Report, OSCE/ODIHR, Warsaw

    Political parties/movements are required to file their balance sheet with the Institutional Secretariat by 30 April of each year; the Institutional Secretariat is to make this information public through the press (Article 8, LFPPM).
    Source: GRECO (2016), Third Evaluation Round, Evaluation Report on San Marino, Transparency of Party Funding, (Theme II), GRECO, Strasbourg

52. Must reports from political parties and/or candidates reveal the identity of donors?
  • CodeSometimes
  • Comment

    Donation above 3,000 EUR.

  • Source

    Contributions amounting to over 3 000 € in a calendar year must be evidenced by a relevant document attached to the balance sheet and containing also the identification data of donors.
    Source: GRECO (2016), Third Evaluation Round, Evaluation Report on San Marino, Transparency of Party Funding, (Theme II), GRECO, Strasbourg

53. Must reports from political parties and/or candidates include information on itemized income?
  • CodeNo data
  • Comment
  • Source
54. Must reports from political parties and/or candidates include information on itemized spending?
  • CodeNo data
  • Comment
  • Source
55. Which institution(s) receives financial reports from political parties and/or candidates?
  • CodeAuditing agency | Parliamentary unit
  • Comment

    BLANK

  • Source

    Political parties/movements are required to file their balance sheet with the Institutional Secretariat by 30 April of each year; the Institutional Secretariat is to make this information public through the press (Article 8, LFPPM). This is done in practice by the legal representative of the political party who hands the accounts to the Institutional Secretariat. The latter then attaches an attestation of its receipt to the balance sheet, whenever it is received, and provides is to the press office of Parliament for release to the press. The Institutional Secretariat is an administrative office which is part of public administration and provides administrative support to the Captains Regent, the Great and General Council (Parliament), the respective parliamentary commissions and the Constitutional Court. Regarding political funding responsibilities, it (i) registers, at the start of a legislature, those political parties and movements which have presented lists and are in Parliament (data on name of party/movement, address of headquarters, information on legal and administrative representatives) and updates such information, as necessary; (ii) acts as depositary of balance sheets; (iii) notifies auditors upon their appointment to the Auditing Committee (see paragraph xx); (iv) acts as depositary of the Auditing Committee annual reports.
    Source: GRECO (2016), Third Evaluation Round, Evaluation Report on San Marino, Transparency of Party Funding, (Theme II), GRECO, Strasbourg

56. Which institution(s) is responsible for examining financial reports and/or investigating violations?
  • CodeYes, institution for this purpose
  • Comment

    Auditing Commitee.

  • Source

    Regarding the system of public oversight for political parties/movements laid out in Article 11 of the LFPPM, each year the balance sheets of parties/movements are audited in order to determine whether they have been drafted clearly and accurately and are completely consistent with the financial position, as well as with the costs and revenue incurred during the year. Such audit is carried out by an Auditing Committee composed of three auditors who are enrolled in the Register of Auditors kept at the Ministry of Industry (there are around 100 registered auditors). The members of the Auditing Committee are chosen in the month of May of each year by a majority vote of the Bureau of the Great and General Council; the Bureau must represent at least two thirds of the members of the Great and General Council. The Bureau is composed by the presidents of the different parliamentary groups and headed by the Captains Regent.
    Source: GRECO (2016), Third Evaluation Round, Evaluation Report on San Marino, Transparency of Party Funding, (Theme II), GRECO, Strasbourg

57. What power is granted to the institution(s) responsible for examining reports and/or investigating violations?
  • CodeCarry out investigation | Request additional information from potential violator
  • Comment

    BLANK

  • Source

    The Committee is entitled to obtain, for auditing purposes, all necessary or useful information and documents from the administrative managers and political leaders of parties and movements, or from any other person within the party holding such information and documents. Moreover, the Committee may carry out assessments, inspections and controls at the headquarters of parties or movements. The Auditing Committee must report to the competent authority (court) any alleged offence identified following the examination of accounting records. It generally takes around 20 work days over an eight month period for the auditors to supervise political accounts.
    Source: GRECO (2016), Third Evaluation Round, Evaluation Report on San Marino, Transparency of Party Funding, (Theme II), GRECO, Strasbourg

58. What sanctions are provided for political finance infractions?
  • CodeFines | Loss of public funding | Loss of political rights
  • Comment

    BLANK

  • Source

    For serious violations of the law or for inaccurate reporting, the audit committee can reduce public funding to a party by half for the following year. In case of repeated breaches during the same legislature, the funding shall not be granted for the year.

    Violations of the ban on anonymous donations are subject to criminal sanctions consisting of imprisonment from 20 to 60 days, and disqualification from suffrage rights, from 2 to 5 years.

    Source: OSCE/ODIHR (2016), Republic of San Marino, Early Parliamentary Elections, 20 November 2016, OSCE/ODIHR Needs Assessment Mission Report, OSCE/ODIHR, Warsaw

    394. Anyone who, during State elections, uses violence, threat or deceit, or offers or promises undue benefits, reimbursements or subsidies for travel and accommodation expenses, to push a citizen to sign a declaration in support of a candidate, draft law, or referendum, or to abstain or not from voting, or to vote for a candidate or symbol, is punished with third-degree imprisonment and fourth-degree loss of political rights.

    Source: Article 394, Criminal Code om Electoral Matters

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