A Glossary of Constitutional Terms: English–Nepali

This publication is only available in electronic format
Published: 
1 December 2007
Language: 
English
Pages: 
92
ISBN: 
978-91-85724-20-8
Available Languages:

Constitutions are legal texts and must be written in a style that is objective, clear and precise.

To reflect the intentions of the law makers, drafters of constitutions and other laws must understand the full meaning of legal terms and the implications that the words used will have and then use the clearest words and formulations consistently.

As legal texts are reference documents and normative guides, the words and formulations used in legal texts must be chosen with care, knowing that they will be subject to review and interpretation over time.

Today the drafting of a constitution and supporting laws calls for a special style of writing that can be understood by ordinary people and not only by select groups of judges and lawyers. Many legal terms, initially developed through Latin-based languages, literally get lost or mangled in translations, or are defined by varied users in differing contexts, creating ambiguity and confusion.

In order to support the constitutional process in Nepal, International IDEA has developed this glossary of constitutional and legal terms. The purposes of the glossary are threefold: to establish Nepali equivalents of English constitutional terms, to standardize Nepali terminologies and to contribute to the development of plain language drafting of legal and constitutional texts at this critical juncture.

Contents

Preface

Acknowledgements

Introduction

Glossary of Constitutional Terms

Appendix: Names of Parts of Legislation in English

Related Content

Nov
02
2017
Cheryl Saunders responds to questions from staff from the Union Attorney General’s Office. Photo credit: Annamari Salonen.

Cheryl Saunders responds to questions from staff from the Union Attorney General’s Office. Photo credit: Annamari Salonen.

News Article
Oct
24
2017
Informal discussion with Her Excellency Ms Amina Bouayach, the Ambassador of Morocco to Sweden. Photo credit: International IDEA

Informal discussion with Amina Bouayach, the Ambassador of Morocco to Sweden. Photo credit: International IDEA

News Article
Sep
14
2017
Mr Krishna Prasad Jaisi, Spokesperson of Association of District Development Committees of Nepal (ADDCN) delivering his views/speech. Photo credit: International IDEA.

Mr Krishna Prasad Jaisi, Spokesperson of Association of District Development Committees of Nepal (ADDCN) delivering his views/speech. Photo credit: International IDEA. 

News Article
Sep
12
2017

The Constitution of Nepal, adopted in 2015, grants women considerable rights—but how can we make sure that the provisions are effectively implemented in the new or amended legal frameworks that are now emerging? This was one of the main issues discussed at the annual Conference of Women Lawyers organized by Nepal’s National Bar Association (NBA) on 1-2 September 2017 in Sindhuli, Nepal.  Photo credit: International IDEA

News Article