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Dominican Republic (Dominican Republic)

Dominican Republic (Dominican Republic) has a Bicameral parliament with legislated quotas for the single/lower house and at the sub-national level. 51 of 190 (27%) seats in the Cámara de Diputados / Chamber of Deputies are held by women.

At a glance

Structure of Parliament: Bicameral

Are there legislated quotas...

  • For the Single/Lower House? Yes
  • For the Upper House?
  • For the Sub-National Level? Yes

Are there voluntary quotas...

  • Adopted by political parties? No

Is there additional information?...

  • Yes

Last updated: Apr 16, 2019

Single/Lower House

Cámara de Diputados / Chamber of Deputies

Total seats 190
Total Women 51
% Women 27%
Election Year 2016
Electoral System List PR
Quota Type Legislated Candidate Quotas¤
Election details IDEA Voter Turnout - IPU Parline
  Legal source Details
Quota type: Legislated Candidate Quotas¤ Constitution

Under Article 39 (para. 5) of the Constitution, the state must promote and guarantee the equal participation of women and men in all nominations for public elections.

Electoral law According to Article 68 (3) of the Electoral Law (Law No. 275-97, as amended by Law 12-2000), political parties in their candidate lists for elections for the Chamber of Deputies (Cámara de Diputados) must include at least 33% women candidates.
Legal sanctions for non-compliance Electoral law

According to the Electoral Law, the lists of the political parties that do not include at least 33% of female candidates will be canceled and not accepted by the Electoral Commission.

Rank order/placement rules Electoral law

Women candidates should be placed on the list in alternate positions with men candidates (Article 68 (3)).

Is the provision of direct public funding to political parties related to gender equality among candidates? No  
See more in International IDEA's Political Finance database
Are there provisions for other financial advantages to encourage gender equality in political parties? No  
See more in International IDEA's Political Finance database

Quota at the Sub-National Level

  • Quota type: Legislated Candidate Quotas¤
  Legal source Details
Quota type: Legislated Candidate Quotas¤ Constitution

The state must promote and guarantee the equal participation of women and men in all nominations for public elections (Article 39, para. 5).

Electoral law

In the nomination of candidates for elective offices at the municipal level, political parties and movements are obliged to maintain and encourage the participation of women. Therefore, when the principal candidate for mayor is a man, the alternate candidate must be a woman and vice versa. In addition, the principal and alternate candidate lists for elections to the municipal councils must include at least 33% of women candidates. In municipalities where only 5 council members are elected, all party lists should include a minimum of 2 women candidates (Article 34 of Law No. 176-07 on municipalities).

Legal sanctions for non-compliance Electoral law According to the Electoral Law, the lists of the political parties that do not include at least 33% of female candidates will be cancelled and not accepted by the Electoral Commission.
Rank order/placement rules Electoral law

Women candidates should be placed on the list in alternate positions with men candidates (Article 68).

Additional Information

In 1997, Electoral Law No. 275 imposed a 25 per cent quota for women among candidates for elective positions. After the elections in 1998, leaders of political parties negotiated with the Central Electoral Commission that this provision would be interpreted as the obligation to guarantee that women's representation at the national level would not be less than 25 per cent (or 45 of the 179 total number of seats for both houses of parliament). This decision, in effect, removed the burden for each individual party to guarantee 25 per cent women among their parliamentary delegations. In 2000, amendments to the electoral law increased the quota provision to 33 per cent,. In 2002 the legislated candidate quota requirement for the Senate was revoked.

Sources

LEGAL SOURCES:

Additional reading

  • Htun, Mala N. 2002. Women in Political Power in Latin America. Manuscript.
  • Htun, Mala N. and Mark P. Jones. 2002. ‘Engendering the Right to Participate in Decision-Making: Electoral Quotas and Women's Leadership in Latin America’, in Nikki Craske and Maxine Molyneux(eds) Gender and the Politics of Rights and Democracy in Latin America. New York: Palgrave. pp. 32-56
  • Peschard, Jacqueline. 2002. The quota system in Latin America: General review. Manuscript.
  • Jimenez Polanco, Jacqueline. 2001. ‘La représentation politique des femmes en Amérique Latine: Une analyse comparée’ (Women's political representation in Latin America: a comparative analysis). Bérengère Marques-Pereira and Patricio Nolasco (eds)  La représentation politique des femmes en Amérique Latine (Women's political representation in Latin America). Brussels: L'Harmattan. pp. 27-81.
  • Women's Leadership Conference of the Americas. 2001. Women and Power in the Americas: A Report Card. Washington: Women's Leadership Conference of the Americas.
  • Htun, Mala N. 1998. Women's Political Participation, Representation and Leadership in Latin America. Issue Brief, Women's Leadership Conference of the Americas.

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