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Conversations on Democracy: Mr. Andrew Ellis
(2015-07-14)
Mr. Andrew Ellis is the Acting Director to International IDEA's Asia and The Pacific Programme
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3XpeSe6HYO4
Conversations on Democracy: Mr. Andrew Ellis
Video
Mr. Andrew Ellis is the Acting Director to International IDEA's Asia and The Pacific Programme
2015-07-14
Interview with Farid Esack
(2014-03-15)

In this in-depth interview, South African self-described feminist Farid Esack discusses issues around justice and injustice, race and racism, gender inequality and equality. Esack is a renowned Muslim scholar and activist, recognized for his work to advance gender equality and end racism. In the 1990s, Nelson Mandela appointed him Gender Commissioner; today he heads the Department of Religion Studies at the University of Johannesburg.

Having grown up in abject poverty in apartheid South Africa, Esack managed to secure a scholarship for religious study in Pakistan at the age of 15. He stayed in Pakistan for nearly a decade, before returning home to form a Muslim anti-apartheid group. His activism against racism saw him detained on several occasions, and in 1990 he left South Africa again, this time to pursue a PhD in Qur’anic studies.

For Esack, the source of his deep commitment to equality and justice stems from his early childhood where he was exposed to oppression and discrimination. In his reading of the Qur’an, God always takes the side of the marginalized and the weak over the powerful, and encourages revolt against injustices when they appear. But for Esack, movements against injustices must always remember to take into account the needs and the rights of the marginalized within the community, highlighting how women and other disadvantaged groups must not be left behind in the struggle for freedom and justice. For Esack, the notion of equality and justice in Islam fits with the idea of feminism. Feminism, for Esack, is a commitment to absolute justice and absolute equality between women and men and those who identify as neither women nor men. Importantly, Esack reminds us that justice and equality is not just something that we have to practice in front of God but also in this world that we live in today and share with another, regardless of race or gender.

In this fascinating interview, Esack expand on his past, his interpretation of Islam, and what it is about Islam that makes it compatible with feminism and other struggles for justice, equality and fairness, always reminding us to see how an intersections of identities associated with class, gender, sexuality and race impacts on our lives and those of our neighbors.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9WSFcJW5YRM
Interview with Farid Esack
Video

In this in-depth interview, South African self-described feminist Farid Esack discusses issues around justice and injustice, race and racism, gender inequality and equality. Esack is a renowned Muslim scholar and activist, recognized for his work to advance gender equality and end racism. In the 1990s, Nelson Mandela appointed him Gender Commissioner; today he heads the Department of Religion Studies at the University of Johannesburg.

Having grown up in abject poverty in apartheid South Africa, Esack managed to secure a scholarship for religious study in Pakistan at the age of 15. He stayed in Pakistan for nearly a decade, before returning home to form a Muslim anti-apartheid group. His activism against racism saw him detained on several occasions, and in 1990 he left South Africa again, this time to pursue a PhD in Qur’anic studies.

For Esack, the source of his deep commitment to equality and justice stems from his early childhood where he was exposed to oppression and discrimination. In his reading of the Qur’an, God always takes the side of the marginalized and the weak over the powerful, and encourages revolt against injustices when they appear. But for Esack, movements against injustices must always remember to take into account the needs and the rights of the marginalized within the community, highlighting how women and other disadvantaged groups must not be left behind in the struggle for freedom and justice. For Esack, the notion of equality and justice in Islam fits with the idea of feminism. Feminism, for Esack, is a commitment to absolute justice and absolute equality between women and men and those who identify as neither women nor men. Importantly, Esack reminds us that justice and equality is not just something that we have to practice in front of God but also in this world that we live in today and share with another, regardless of race or gender.

In this fascinating interview, Esack expand on his past, his interpretation of Islam, and what it is about Islam that makes it compatible with feminism and other struggles for justice, equality and fairness, always reminding us to see how an intersections of identities associated with class, gender, sexuality and race impacts on our lives and those of our neighbors.

2014-03-15
IDEA TALKS with Nepal's parliamentary secretariat SG Manohar Bhattarai
(Stockholm, Sweden, 2013-10-01)
Nepal's parliamentary secretariat Secretary General Manohar Bhattarai on Nepal's democratic transition, 1 October 2013
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D7yI7vUr-CY
IDEA TALKS with Nepal's parliamentary secretariat SG Manohar Bhattarai
Video
Nepal's parliamentary secretariat Secretary General Manohar Bhattarai on Nepal's democratic transition, 1 October 2013
Stockholm, Sweden
2013-10-01

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